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Why My Vote Matters Essay

why my vote matters essay

Example 1

“Why does my vote matter” is a question commonly asked every time we approach Election Day. In 2016, forty percent of the eligible voters in the United States did not show up to the polls on November 8th, because they believe that their vote does not matter. Little do they know that every single vote matters and one vote can make a very big difference.

In the presidential election of 1960, John F. Kennedy won the election against Richard Nixon. About sixty percent of the United States population showed up to the polls meaning 72 million people did not vote that November. John F. Kennedy won the popular vote by 112,809 votes. This was the closest presidential election in the history of the United States. If the 72 million people that did not vote that day, went to the polls, the history of the United States could have been changed in very drastic ways. That is not a lot of people if you compare that number to the population of the US at the time.

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Your vote is your voice in the nation. You can vote for what you want in your government. Voting lets you find people similar to you and you get to pick someone who has similar views to you to be in charge of our nation. Voting gives you the opportunity to control what goes on in your national government, your state government, and your local government. Every year local and state governments host elections that allow you to pick who is in charge of the factors in your everyday life. On Election Day you also have the opportunity to vote on bills that most directly impact your everyday life.

As a citizen of the United States of America, we are given the right to vote. The right to vote is a great thing that not every human has the right to. As an American, we are blessed because in other countries the people cannot control any part of their government. They have to follow orders and stick with what they have. In the United States, we have the opportunity to change what we don’t like and to make what we have better. Many years ago, only a white male over the age of twenty one could vote for the leaders of our nation. Now all citizens who register to vote can pick the people they want in charge of the country. The United States of America gives its citizens many opportunities that other countries cannot offer.

In 2020 I plan on voting for the next president of the United States. I want my voice to be heard. If I do not vote I might lose my right to vote because someone who thinks democracy is ruining the country might become the leader of our nation. Democracy is very important to the structure of the country. Democracy promotes equality among the citizens by giving everyone the chance to determine the laws. Also, democracy provides a method to resolve conflicts and allows an opportunity to correct mistakes that might have been made. It is very important that everyone takes part in voting because voting is what makes a change. Your voice is your vote and your vote really does matter. I want to see this country change for the better and that will not happen unless we get up and vote.

 

Example 2

Presidential elections are held every four years on the first Tuesday of November. All United States citizens over 18 years of age are eligible to vote. Citizens living outside the United States can vote by asking for an absentee ballot in advance and mailing it to their voting district. Each resident of the United States must register to vote and it’s assigned a voting place. This avoids people voting twice at different locations.

The presidential election process is interesting because it is the only important elected office where the people do not directly vote for the president. In reality, the people vote for the electoral college dates from the early days of the presidential election process, when transportation and communication were not what they are today.

In the old days, each state was assigned a number of electoral votes based on its population. This system is still in effect today, with populous states like California, New York, Florida, Texas, and Illinois carrying much more weight than sparsely populated smaller states like North Dakota, Rhode Island, Delaware, Wyoming, and Alaska.

This means essentially that the individual voter votes not for his or her candidate of choice, but rather for someone who intern votes according to the majority in the state. Therefore, if one candidate wins for only one vote in a given state, all the electoral votes of that state go to that candidate, This means that it is possible for the popular vote to be different from the electoral vote, causing someone to be elected that did not have a majority of the votes of the American people. In practice, this has only happened once, during the election of Samuel Adams in 1803. This caused a constitutional crisis in which was resolved by a special vote in congress, allowing the candidate with the most votes to win.

However, before I get to the actual election, there is an important process to complete to choose the candidates that will run for office. This is the primary process. Starting about a year before the election, states begin to hold primary elections. The first is always held in New Hampshire and tradition has it that whoever wins in New Hampshire will win the nomination for the presidency.

Each political party held its own primary in each state. At the end of the primaries, each party holds a convention to nominate their candidate of choice and to publish their ideas and views so the public can choose between the candidates. These published ideas and vies are called a party platform and each mayor party has one.

The major parties are the Republicans and the Democrats. There has never been a very successful third party in the United States, although Ross Perot and John Anderson tried to launch one in the elections of 1992 and 1988 respectively. This year, former senator Bob Dole is running for the Republican party, and the current president, Bill Clinton is running for reelection. If re-elected, Bill Clinton will not be able to run again because constitutionally, the president is limited to two consecutive four-year terms.

This limitation is relatively recent. in fact, Franklin Delano Roosevelt ran and was elected three times. His third election represented a break in a tradition started by George Washington when he decided not to run a third time. However, it is widely believed that Roosevelt’s third election was tolerated because the country was in the middle of World War II. When Roosevelt died on April 12, 1945, he had yet completed his third term. According to the constitution, Harry Truman, The Vice President finished his term.

Each candidate has his own views on important issues. For example, Bob Dole has recently proposed a cut in the Capitol gains tax. In addition, he is against abortion and favors less government intervention in business. In contrast, Bill Clinton thinks that taxes should not be reduced right now. He also would allow abortion in certain cases, like rape, or if the mother’s life were in danger. Clinton would create more government to reform health care and welfare. However, despite their differences, the candidates have more in common than one might think. For example, both belief in democracy and the American electoral process. Both belief in a strong America and on independent Foreign policy.

The press has an interesting and growing role in the political process. Before the modern age of telecommunications, the press’s role was relatively limited. However, since television was invented, the role of the press has gotten more and more important. The first election in which the press had a decisive role was in 1960. The Republican candidate was Richard Nixon and the Democratic candidate was John Kennedy. The two candidates held a debate on television. Richard Nixon hadn’t shaved well enough and started to sweat under the lights of the television studio.

Kennedy looked fresh and youthful. The result was that Nixon looked untrustworthy and evil. He lost the election. Of course, he went on to win the first of his two elections in 1968. In that election, he had learned to use the power of the press to his advantage. Today, the press follows every movement of the candidate,

his family, and his staff. Every movement is looked at closely. The good part of this is that the American people can be better informed. This information allows for better decision making at election time and ensures the continued success of the American political system.

 

Example 3

Whenever elections are won or lost by a big bulk, it may offer people, especially young adults, the impression that their votes don’t matter. They understand the situation as quite simple: the outcome would be the exact same regardless or not when they had exercised their one vote or otherwise not. But this mindset isn’t just harmful and cultivates a dangerous feeling of apathy, additionally is extremely wrong. In states being overwhelmingly red or blue, it surely can feel just like your vote is lost in a sea which either with you or against you.

So when one researcher recently described, it is vital to acknowledge that voting is onerous (McColl, 2016). It can be tedious to look up one’s polling place and also make time before or after work to vote. Going before work means waking up previous and going after work means being tired and postponing dinner. You might be frequently committing to standing in line for a time, frequently in a spot that’s crowded rather than terribly great looking.

But this short article demonstrates why it’s always important to vote, even when a state overwhelmingly occurs one political way. Voting is the responsibility of each and every citizen and if you don’t honor it accordingly, you might be switching your straight back on your duties as a participant within a democracy.

One of many reasons that your vote matters is voting is about so much more than influencing the last outcome. Obviously, all voters are invested in having their desired applicants elected, but voting is also a means of asserting that you will be purchased the direction that democracy takes. Analysis has found regularly that policymakers spend closer awareness of the partialities and objectives of people that inhabit areas that have greater levels of voter turnout (Griffin & Newman, 2005).

Other researchers have found “higher levels of citizen participation sign to representatives greater surveillance of the actions by their constituents and, thus, an increased probability of sanction. Representatives respond to these signals by deploying resources with techniques that provide better intelligence of region requirements and choices. As a result, greater citizen participation is rewarded with improved policy responsiveness” (Martin & Claibourn, 2013).

Another reason that voting is indeed essential is basically that there are still close races for elected officials, in which literally every vote is important and counted many times. In 2015, Mississippi stunned the planet when the election for state representative needed to be determined by “drawing straws.

Blaine Eaton II and his Republican challenger, Mark Tullos had each gotten exactly 4,589 votes (Fausset, 2015). The work of drawing straws needed to be done in order to settle the tie. Such an event appears unfathomable in these contemporary times, however, the reality remains that it did take place. Of all 9,178 people who voted for either candidate, do not require can ever think that their vote didn’t matter: they all had definitive proof it did and they will probably never ever skip an election once more. The truth is, any and every election gets the possible to wield this amount of value for each vote.

Yet another aspect that may shed light upon why every vote is essential revolves around the fact that the “my vote doesn’t matter belief” are contagious and dangerous. “Research on a past election showed that, of affluent people earning over $150,000 per year, an astonishing 50 percent arrived during the polls. Having said that, of 18 to 24 12 months olds making under $30,000 per year, only 12 percent turned up to vote” (Cormier, 2016). Issued, one might argue that the people making over $150,000 each year had been probably older and understand how crucial elections are from life experience.

However, college-aged young people must certainly be fresh from the classes of their education, which dictates the importance of civic duty such as for example voting. Using the information supply into the information stated above, if you will find 100 18-24 yr old voters for every 20 more affluent voters, it might be too possible for young voters to consider that it’s not essential to allow them to vote.

For example, if only 12 percent of young adults vote, that would only offer an overall total of 12 votes. If over 50percent of most wealthier voters vote, such as for example 65percent, that could offer an overall total of 13 votes (Cormier, 2016). This shows how large populations of voters will get overrun by an inferior majority which makes an attempt to show a way for an election.

 

Interesting ideas

I just recently entered a Hair Contest held by a HUGE corp. To vote people had to go to Facebook and “like” my entry. I was ahead THE WHOLE time.. I figured I was going to win. well… that day, one of the contestants pushed their friends and family to vote like crazy and sure enough… that night, we were 1 single vote off…. right at the time cut off. she pulled ahead of me right after that. It was kind of ironic actually and hard to believe. I really didn’t think I won because she pulled ahead right at the cut off time. But because I was 1 vote ahead at 12:00am… I won. If 2 people didn’t vote that said “my vote won’t matter” didn’t… I would have lost.


I find one vote doesn’t matter much. However, when I think of myself as representative of potentially thousands of like-minded individuals, my decision to vote or not could be counted as thousands when you consider how many others are asking themselves the same questions and reaching the same conclusions.

Besides, after the 2000 elections (the last election I skipped), I decided I can’t really trust my countrymen to make the best decisions. My vote may not count for much, but I will make sure my opinions on the issues are counted.


After the primaries, the candidates are very interested in your vote, if you live in a swing state (such as Florida) with approximately an equal number of voters who are likely to vote Democratic and Republican.

On the other hand, if you live in a clear Red or Blue state, the candidates will pay no attention to what people in your state need after the primaries. – It doesn’t matter whether your state is large or small. Both the Red state of Utah and the Blue state of California are ignored after the primaries.

Most states are spectators in the general election – but candidates will visit them to raise money before the primaries.

Fortunately, there is a realistic way to make the Electoral College irrelevant without a constitutional amendment.


If you can’t vote someone else decides your fate. You then had better hope they see you as valuable. Chances are they will see you as someone who needs to use their resources. In which case you will be expendable.

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Why My Vote Matters Essay. (2020, Nov 11). Retrieved November 23, 2020, from https://essayscollector.com/examples/why-my-vote-matters-essay/



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