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Vegetarianism Essay

vegetarianism essay

Example 1

“You are what you eat”, goes a famous saying. And if that is truly the case, then a lot of Americans would appear to be unhealthy, chemically treated, commercially raised slabs of animal flesh. And while that is not a particularly pleasant thought, it is nonetheless an description of the typical American omnivore who survives on the consumption of Big Macs and steak fajitas. But there are individuals who do not follow this American norm and have altered their diets so that they do not consume any meat.

These people are vegetarians and they are the new breed of healthy Americans who refuse to poison themselves with fats, cholesterol, and the other harmful additives that come from meat. And while once thought to be a movement that would never gain much momentum, it has nonetheless moved itself to the forefront of Americans? healthy diets.

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The word vegetarian, used to describe the diets of people who do not consume animal flesh, was not used until around the mid-1800s. The concept of vegetarianism, however, dates back much further. The Greek philosopher Pythagoras, considered by many to be the father of vegetarianism, encouraged a non-meat diet among his followers as a diet that was the most natural and healthful.

A vegetarian diet excludes the consumption of meat and can be exercised by people for a number of reasons. The largest majority of individuals choosing vegetarianism related to health reasons. For example, someone with an ulcer might be prescribed a strict diet of vegetables in order to promote the healing process, or someone with a dangerously high level of cholesterol might be advised to follow a vegetarian diet to lower his or her fat and cholesterol intake.

The immorality of consuming animal flesh is another argument touted by a smaller group of vegetarians. This moral argument for vegetarianism and the effect of what meat-eating might have on the character of humans; some people have come to believe and fear that in the suffering and killing which occurs in commercial farming, we demean ourselves, coarsen our sensitivities and dull our feelings of sympathy with our fellow creatures. Almost to a point where it becomes easier for us to contemplate and carry out the torture and killing of human beings.

Whatever the reasons behind a person’s choice to be a vegetarian, it is important to understand the different diets that individual vegetarians can choose. In the widest sense of the word, a vegetarian diet is a diet that is made up of grains, vegetables, and fruit but does not include any animal meat, such as fish, pork, poultry, or beef. Beyond these standards, there are many variations of diets that occur within the world of vegetarianism.

The first and most common category of vegetarianism is a Lacto-Ovo vegetarian. This a person who includes dairy products and eggs but no animal meat. This means that there is a consumption of animal byproducts, such as milk, eggs, and cheese.

Another variation is the Lacto-vegetarian diet that allows the consumption of milk and other milk products but does not include the consumption of eggs. Like all vegetarians, these two groups do not consume fish, poultry, or meat. The third category that vegetarians can fall into is vegans. The vegan diet is by far the most strict of all vegetarian diets. Vegans shun all animal products.

Foods that involve animal processing to any degree are often avoided. This means that vegans can consume no foods containing any animal byproducts, such as milk, eggs, or cheese. Being a vegan often dictates an “animal friendly” lifestyle that, aside from not eating anything that came from an animal, also abstains from buying or using products that were tested on animals or are made from animal hairs or skin, such as leather shoes or belts.

A common misconception of vegetarians is that they are all a bunch of skinny, malnourished idealists who live on plants and soy milk. Another common misconception is that a diet of protein is a diet that builds strength and muscle. Professor Irving Fisher of Yale designed a series of tests in which he compared the strength and stamina of meat-eaters against vegetarians, with three groups of individuals represented: meat-eating athletes, vegetarian athletes, and sedentary vegetarians.

His studies showed that the average score of the two vegetarian groups was over double the average score of the carnivores, even though half of the vegetarians were sedentary people and all of the carnivores were athletes. Fisher concluded that, “….the difference in endurance between the flesh-eaters and the abstainers (was due) entirely to the difference in their diet…There is strong evidence that a … non-flesh … diet is conducive to endurance.”

A comparable study was done in 1968 by a Danish group of researchers that tested a group of men on a variety of diets, using a stationary bicycle to measure their strength and endurance. The scientists fed their test subjects a diet that was comprised of mixed amounts of vegetables and meats for a period of time before testing the men on the stationary bicycle.

The average time that they could pedal before muscle failure was 114 minutes. The very same group of subjects was then fed a diet that consisted of only meat, eggs, and milk for an equal amount of time. They were then re-tested on the bikes.

On a normal “well balanced” diet, it seemed their pedaling time before muscle failure dropped dramatically to an average of only 57 minutes. That same group of men was again fed a diet that this time was made of entirely of grains, vegetables, and fruits before they were once again tested on exercise bikes.

The lack of animal byproducts didn’t seem to hamper their performance, as many people would have thought, and the men were able to pedal an average of 167 minutes before muscle failure. A considerably longer amount than when they ate animal products.

Yet still, vegetarians are still often criticized by people who feel that they do not get enough minerals and vitamins as a result of their limited diet. But vegetarian food is among some of the healthiest foods available to mankind and while there is no easy way to determine the extent to which a vegetarian diet can influence the health of those that follow its guidelines, the evidence is very indicative that it may be an important contributing factor.

Evidence is good that risks for hypertension, coronary artery disease, type II diabetes, and gallstones are lower. Data seems to show that the risks of breast cancer, diverticular disease of the colon, colonic cancer, calcium kidney stones, osteoporosis, dental erosion, and dental caries are lower among vegetarians.

Vegetarian diets contain less total fat and less saturated fat, which are linked to increased risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. In comparing the diets of vegetarians to omnivores, we see that the American omnivore consumes a diet that is 34% to 36% fat, lacto-ovo vegetarians eat a 30% to 36% fat diet, and vegans eat a diet that is about 30% fat, which is the recommended amount of fat intake for whatever ones diet consists of. This means that vegetarians also consume less cholesterol, which has been linked to an increase in the risk of heart disease and possibly even cancer.

The amount of cholesterol of a Lacto-Ovo vegetarian is about 150 to 300 mg of cholesterol per day compared to the 400 mg of cholesterol that an omnivore consumes. Vegans, who exclude the intake of any food that contains animal byproducts, do not consume foods that contain significant amounts of cholesterol. The US Department of Agriculture and Health and Human Services has created a Food Guide to better advise Americans on how to eat healthier, more balanced meals, and which “advises using fats, oils, and sweets sparingly.” Vegetarians as a group also consume higher amounts of fiber.

Fiber, found mainly in grain products, is essential to healthy bowels and colons, lowers the risk for diabetes, helps control blood glucose levels, and also lowers the risk for cancer and heart disease. It is grain products that form the base of the Food Guide Pyramid, which recommends servings of bread, rice, cereal, and pasta 6 to 11 times per day. The typical intake of fiber for an average omnivore is about 12g of fiber each day, with vegetarians eating 50% to 100% more fiber than non-vegetarians. That is a considerably higher amount.

A vegetarian diet also includes the consumption of more antioxidants, which are believed to reduce the risk of cancer, heart disease, and possibly arthritis and cataracts. Dietary antioxidants include such vitamins as vitamin E and vitamin C.

While vegetarians consume less total protein, they do consume adequate amounts to maintain a healthy balance, as demonstrated by modern nutritional science. Excess protein, and in particular excess animal protein, is linked to the increased risk for osteoporosis, kidney stone formation, kidney disease, and an increase in blood cholesterol levels.

The nutritional benefits of a vegetarian diet very clearly appear to be beneficial to human health. But a vegetarian diet can also be healthy for the lives of our planet’s other inhabitants, the very animals that are being eaten or the way they are being raised to meet our mass consumption of animal products.

Due to the increased demand for food, livestock farmers have had to keep up by devising new and more efficient ways to raise more animals, giving way to the industrialization of meat farming. Hormones, chemicals, and steroids are all used to aid in the quicker process of animal growth and production. Chickens, as we grew up believing, were farmyard animals that were free to roam the yards.

Due to the industrialization of chicken farming in the past forty years, all this has changed. The days of the barnyard chicken are over, replaced instead with the assembly-line chicken. But the poultry farmers are not alone in its industrialization. The beef, turkey, pork, and other meat industries have also had to adapt their methods of production in order to keep up with the demands of omnivores. This includes the use of growth hormones in the animals to produce more eggs and fatter animals, which are then passed on to their human consumers.

A chemical called XLP-30 is designed to boost pigs per litter, though it has a name that sounds like it should be added to motor oil instead of animal food. Incredibly, Officials acknowledge they don’t know why it works. This is just one example of the chemical tampering that the meat industry is forced to do with its animals in order to fight off the diseases that the animals? cramped, unsanitary living conditions bring with them.

Leonardo Da Vinci said, “the time will come when men such as I will look on the murder of animals as they now look on the murder of men.” While the cruelty of murdering animals for their flesh is a moral argument in favor of vegetarianism, it seems rather unlikely that Americans could ever be swayed by its message.

However, many Americans are interested in preserving their own health and well-being, and that should lead many people towards a vegetarian lifestyle since a vegetarian diet includes the necessary vitamins and minerals to sustain human life, without any of the negative byproducts of animal consumption, such as cholesterol, excessive fat, and excessive protein.

A healthy lifestyle is something that benefits us all, and yet most people are unwilling to give up meat-filled diets. If the phrase “You are what you eat” has any amount of truth to it, then Americans need to realize what they are ingesting every time they enjoy a Big Mac, some Whoppers, or a filet mignon. There are healthier alternatives to meat-eating that nearly every member of our society has been weaned on, and those alternatives all include the consumption of more vegetables and the absence of meats.

It is now up to them to realize this and make the necessary adjustments.

 

Example 2

“Nothing will benefit human health and increase the chances for survival of life on Earth as much as the evolution to a vegetarian diet.” – Albert Einstein

What is Vegetarianism?

Vegetarianism is the practice of not eating meat or some animal products, depending on the degree of vegetarianism.

There are various types of vegetarianism, each with its own benefits, but also its own difficulties. The first of the three main types, and most common, is Ovo-Lacto. Ovo-Lacto vegetarians eat no meat (red meat, poultry, or seafood), but do eat eggs and dairy products. The second type is Lacto. Lacto vegetarians do not eat meat or eggs but do eat dairy products. The last, and strictest, of the types is vegans. Vegans do not eat meat, eggs, dairy products, foods containing animal by-products, or even honey. Vegans oftentimes do not even use products such as leather, angora, wool, silk, or any product tested on animals.

Besides the three main types, there are also people who choose not to eat red meat but do eat poultry and seafood. There are also a few offshoots of vegetarianism, such as raw/living foodists and fruitarians.

Why Vegetarianism?

There are several reasons why people choose to become vegetarians. A few of the more common reasons are the health benefits, the terrible treatment of livestock animals, and harm to the environment.

The Health benefits of vegetarianism are tremendous. A vegetarian diet will help prevent cancer, prevent heart disease, lower blood pressure, and prevent or even reverse diabetes. Eating less meat reduces your risk of a heart attack by 50%, and a vegan diet reduces the risk by 90%. A vegetarian diet also reduces the risk of E-coli. Diseases and bacteria often slip through meat inspection. Nine thousand US citizens become ill each year from contaminated meat.

Livestock is forced to live in terrible conditions, are treated horribly, and are brutally killed. They are often branded with hot irons, tails cut off, teeth removed, and castrated, all without anesthesia. The animals are malnourished so their meat will be the “right” color and texture. They are injected with harmful antibiotics, forcing the animal to grow up too fast. The rapid growth doesn’t allow enough time for their vital organs to catch up with their body. They are usually kept in a tight wire cage, unable to move. Only more pain? electrocution or a dull blade ends their pain.

Raising livestock causes much damage to the environment. Half of the water in the United States goes to some agricultural production. However, while producing each pound of wheat uses twenty-five gallons, producing each pound of beef uses 2,500 gallons of water. Sixty-four percent of US farmland is used to produce feed for livestock.

Twelve million children go hungry each night. If we used the farmland to produce food for humans, not cattle, we could feed 1.3 million of those children, maybe more. Two billion tons of wastes from livestock are produced each year. The waste (which is full of toxic chemicals, such as ammonia, nitrates, herbicides, and pesticides) eventually ends up in our lakes, streams, and groundwater. Also, many plants and animals become extinct due to the destruction of forests to raise livestock.

History of Vegetarianism

Our hominid ancestors evolved over a period of 24 million years, and for all but 1.5 million years, lived on an almost completely vegetarian diet (except for the occasional insect and grub). Since then, however, humans have changed their ways. However, a recent upward trend suggests that many of us may be returning to our natural diet.

Pythagoras was a prominent modern vegetarian. His Pythagorean diet discouraged the consumption of meat. Then his diet died out until the Manicheans in the early century AD. They were heretics with vegetarianism as one of their main ideas. Thomas Tyron was a prominent vegetarian of the 17th century. In the 18th century, a writer and dietician, Dr. William Lambe recommended a vegetarian diet as a cure for cancer. In the early 1800s, membership in the Vegetarian Society reached over 2,000. Now, it is a more acceptable lifestyle than decades ago. In 1994, more than 12.4 million Americans said they were vegetarians. The number is predicted to rise.

Vegetarian Nutrition

A vegetarian is not just limited to salad every day. There are a huge variety of foods that can ensure a vegetarian gets proper nutrition. It is even possible for expecting mothers, young children, teenagers, and pets to be healthy on a vegetarian diet. Below is the vegetarian food pyramid, an important guide for vegetarians to follow.

In fact, vegetarians can get every essential nutrient from non-meat foods. Below is a list of nutrients that are harder for a vegetarian to get, and the foods in which they can be found.

Protein- Lentils, tofu, low-fat dairy products, nuts, seeds, tempeh, and peas.

Iron- Dried beans, spinach, chard, beet greens, leafy greens, blackstrap molasses, bulgar, prune juice, dried fruit, legumes, whole grains, cereals, and whole wheat bread.

Zinc- Whole grains, wheat bread, legumes, nuts, and tofu.

Vitamin B12- Dairy products, eggs, fortified foods (such as Grapenuts), some brands of nutritional yeast and soymilk, tempeh, and sea vegetables.

Calcium- Collard greens, broccoli, kale, low-fat dairy products, turnip greens, tofu prepared with calcium, fortified soymilk, seeds, nuts, legumes, grain products, and calcium-enriched orange juice.

 

Example 3

Vegetarianism is the limitation of one’s diet to only plants, vegetables, grains, and fruits, without eating any food derived from an animal. There are different extremes of vegetarianism, where you can eat dairy, but not eggs, only milk, etc? And the reasons why people convert to this diet differ. Health, religion, compassion for the animals, usually varies. Vegetarianism has been around for centuries, beginning with the peaceful Hindu and Buddhist religions, but recently we have seen the eruption of more militant vegetarianism that is inspired by the “animal rights” movement.

Today, vegetarian activists are throwing pies at Ronald McDonald and the Pork Queen, scrawling, “meat is murder” in prominent locations, committing terrorist acts of arson, and waging media campaigns equating meat consumption with cannibalism. Vegetarianism is becoming a soapbox more than a healthier diet.

The guidelines from the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Health and

Human Services advise 2 to 3 daily servings of milk, which vegetarians do not drink, and the same amounts of foods such as eggs, meat, poultry and fish. They recommend 3 to 5 servings of vegetables, 2 to 4 of fruits, and 6 to 11 servings of bread, cereal, rice, and pasta. In other words, 11 to 20 plant foods, but only 4 to 6 animal foods. Vegetarians are, on average, far healthier than those who eat the typical Western diet and enjoy a lower incidence of many chronic diseases. Vegetarians are consuming less cholesterol and fat than carnivorous eaters. Vegetarian diets offer disease protection benefits because of their lower saturated fat, cholesterol, and animal protein content.

However, it has not been proven that one must eliminate meat from one’s diet in order to be healthy. It has been aptly demonstrated that the typical Western diet contains too much fat. Eliminating meat from the diet is one way to reduce fat, but it is not the only way. Eating meat responsibly and adding more carbohydrates to your diet can also reduce fat. Vegetarian diets have also been known to cure and/or prevent diseases.

For example, Soya beans contain high concentrations of substances now known to be cancer-preventers, and several studies show that soya consumption can reduce both colon and rectal cancer. And according to The Journal of the American Medical Association, a vegetarian diet can prevent 97 percent of coronary occlusions.

But vegetarian diets have also been shown to increase the risk of nutrient deficiencies. Children are particularly vulnerable and can lead to growth problems. Vegetarian children often fail to grow as well as their omnivorous counterparts. Adults who choose to become vegetarian at mature age are less susceptible to the health downfalls of the diet. But young children who are raised in a vegetarian household are lacking serious nutrients necessary for proper growth.

Vegetarians who eat no animal flesh or dairy products risk vitamin B12 deficiency, which can result in irreversible nerve deterioration. The need for vitamin B12 increases during pregnancy, breast-feeding, and the period of adolescence growth. Vegetarians with high nutrient needs, such as athletes and pregnant women, especially need these lacked vitamins. And not receiving all of these vitamins can be detrimental to one’s health.

Also, ovo-vegetarians, who eat eggs but no dairy foods or animal flesh, may have inadequate vitamin D and calcium. Inadequate vitamin D may cause rickets in children, while inadequate calcium can contribute to the risk of osteoporosis in later years. These vegetarians are susceptible to iron deficiency anemia because they are only missing the more readily absorbed iron from animal flesh. A vegetarian diet needs to be looked at with extreme scrutiny, as not to endanger one’s health.

Ecological arguments against omnivorous and carnivorous eating habits are little more than an attempt by those from the less popular “animal rights” movement to riding the coattails of the more popular environmental movement. In some cases, warnings of impending environmental cataclysm are used to advance an ethical agenda. However, arguments to the effect that eating meat is destroying the planet overlook that the planet has not yet been destroyed despite millions of years of omnivorous and carnivorous eating by millions of individuals from a multitude of species. Carnivores make up the majority of the food chain, both human and animal.

The Second Law of Thermodynamics dictates that some energy will be inevitably lost as one moves up the food web. Therefore, arguments about how it takes “X” pounds of plant protein to generate “Y” pounds of meat have a sound theoretical basis. However, these arguments are often overstated. These arguments falsely assume that pork chops and steak are the only products of animal agriculture. They falsely presume that a pound of animal foodstuffs is nutritionally and energetically equivalent to a pound of plant foodstuffs.

These arguments also ignore the energy content and opportunity cost of replacing animal by-products, which is considerable. Even the animal’s excrement is a valuable resource. Certain animal products, such as fetal calf serum, collagen and laminin are crucial for medical research using cell cultures and have no available alternatives. Is saving a cow worth letting a human die? One can say “yes”, but what if he were the human that was ill? And if certain practices associated with animal agriculture are found to be ecologically unsound, it does not merit a general opposition to eating meat.

Though not practical for everyone, hunting and fishing bypass any potential ecological destruction associated with plant or animal agriculture. They are thus two of the most ecologically sound ways to obtain one’s sustenance. Those who would oppose even limited exploitation of these alternatives have ethical concerns masquerading as environmental concerns.

The most disingenuous ecological ploy made by “ethical” vegetarians is the “…we could feed X starving people with Y percent of the resources devoted to animal agriculture…” argument. First, it falsely implies that humans are starving because of insufficient production capacity. World hunger is a result of the deficient distribution of food, not the deficient capacity for the production of food. Our capacity to produce grain is so vast that we actually pay farmers not to produce. Secondly, if the argument were valid, the resultant increase in the human population would worsen rather than remedy ecological concerns regarding the human population.

Though vegetarianism does offer clear health benefits, such as the diet has been known to commonly cure coronary heart disease (coupled with medication), one need not become vegetarian in order to be healthy. Diet is only one important aspect of health. The avoidance of harmful habits such as smoking is as important, if not more so. A vegetarian diet is not necessarily always healthier than a diet consisting of meat.

A very strict and regimented vegetarian diet is needed to acquire all essential nutrients for living well. Meat does carry proteins and nutrients very helpful to a healthy diet. If eaten in moderation, the fats and cholesterols in meat can have minimal bad effects on the body. Eating meat is not always sucking down a greasy cheeseburger. A balanced diet’s definition does include meat. If the diet is looked at with honest concern and responsibility, a diet including meat can be as healthy as a vegetarian diet.

 

Example 4

Vegetarianism is the limitation of one’s diet to only vegetables. Vegetarianism has been around for centuries, but recently we have seen the eruption of more militant vegetarianism that is inspired by the animal “rights” movement. Today, vegetarian activists are throwing pies at Ronald McDonald and the Pork Queen, scrawling “meat is murder” in prominent locations, committing terrorist acts of arson, and waging media campaigns equating meat consumption with cannibalism.

Vegetarians are, on average, far healthier than those who consume the typical Western diet and enjoy a lower incidence of many chronic diseases. However, it has not been proven that one must eliminate meat from one’s diet in order to be healthy. It has been aptly demonstrated that the typical Western diet contains too much fat. Eliminating meat from the diet is one way to reduce fat, but it is not the only way. Vegetarian diets have also been shown to increase the risk of nutrient deficiencies. Children are particularly vulnerable and can lead to growth problems.

Vegetarian children often fail to grow as well as their omnivorous counterparts despite protein intakes. Ecological arguments against omnivorous and carnivorous eating are little more than an attempt by those from the less popular animal “rights” movement to ride the coattails of the more popular environmental movement. In some cases, warnings of impending environmental cataclysm are used to advance an ethical agenda.

However, arguments to the effect that eating meat is “destroying the planet” overlook that the planet has not yet been destroyed despite millions of years of omnivorous and carnivorous eating by millions of individuals from a multitude of species. The Second Law of Thermodynamics dictates that some energy will be inevitably lost as one moves up the food web. Therefore, arguments about how it takes X pounds of plant protein to generate Y pounds of meat have a sound theoretical basis. However, these arguments are often overstated. These arguments falsely assume that pork chops and steak are the only products of animal agriculture. They falsely presume that a pound of animal foodstuffs is nutritionally and energetically equivalent to a pound of plant foodstuffs.

These arguments also ignore the energy content and opportunity cost of replacing animal by-products, which is considerable. Even the animal’s excrement is a valuable resource. Certain animal products, such as fetal calf serum, collagen, and laminin are crucial for medical research using cell cultures and have no available alternatives. If certain practices associated with animal agriculture are found to be ecologically unsound, it does not merit a general opposition to eating meat. Though not practical for everyone, hunting and fishing bypass any potential ecological destruction associated with plant or animal agriculture. They are thus two of the most ecologically sound ways to obtain one’s sustenance.

Those who would oppose even limited exploitation of these alternatives have ethical concerns masquerading as environmental concerns. The most disingenuous ecological ploy made by “ethical” vegetarians is the “…we could feed X starving people with Y percent of the resources devoted to animal agriculture…” argument. First, it falsely implies that humans are starving because of insufficient production capacity.

World hunger is a result of the deficient distribution of food, not the deficient capacity for the production of food. Our capacity to produce grain is so vast that we actually pay farmers not to produce. Secondly, if the argument were valid, the resultant increase in the human population would exacerbate rather than remedy ecological concerns regarding the human population.

Though vegetarianism does offer clear health benefits, one need not become vegetarian in order to have a healthy diet. Diet is only one important aspect of health. The avoidance of harmful habits such as smoking is as important, if not more so. Killing less sentient beings for sustenance is not ethically superior when one can, through fruitarianism, minimize the intentional killing of all macroscopic beings.

 

Example 5

Vegetarianism is the limitation of one’s diet to only plants, vegetables, grains, and fruits, without eating any food derived from an animal. There are different extremes of vegetarianism, where you can eat dairy, but not eggs, only milk, etc.- And the reasons why people convert to this diet differ. Health, religion, compassion for the animals, usually varies. Vegetarianism has been around for centuries, beginning with the peaceful Hindu and Buddhist religions, but recently we have seen the eruption of more militant vegetarianism that is inspired by the “animal rights” movement.

Today, vegetarian activists are throwing pies at Ronald McDonald and the Pork Queen, scrawling, “meat is murder” in prominent locations, committing terrorist acts of arson, and waging media campaigns equating meat consumption with cannibalism. Vegetarianism is becoming a soapbox more than a healthier diet.

The guidelines from the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services advise 2 to 3 daily servings of milk, which vegetarians do not drink, and the same amounts of foods such as eggs, meat, poultry, and fish. They recommend 3 to 5 servings of vegetables, 2 to 4 of fruits, and 6 to 11 servings of bread, cereal, rice, and pasta. In other words, 11 to 20 plant foods, but only 4 to 6 animal foods.

Vegetarians are, on average, far healthier than those who eat the typical Western diet and enjoy a lower incidence of many chronic diseases. Vegetarians are consuming less cholesterol and fat than carnivorous eaters. Vegetarian diets offer disease protection benefits because of their lower saturated fat, cholesterol, and animal protein content.

However, it has not been proven that one must eliminate meat from one’s diet in order to be healthy. It has been aptly demonstrated that the typical Western diet contains too much fat. Eliminating meat from the diet is one way to reduce fat, but it is not the only way. Eating meat responsibly and adding more carbohydrates to your diet can also reduce fat. Vegetarian diets have also been known to cure and/or prevent diseases. For example, Soya beans contain high concentrations of substances now known to be cancer-preventers, and several studies show that soya consumption can reduce both colon and rectal cancer. And according to The Journal of the American Medical Association, a vegetarian diet can prevent 97 percent of coronary occlusions.

But vegetarian diets have also been shown to increase the risk of nutrient deficiencies. Children are particularly vulnerable and can lead to growth problems. Vegetarian children often fail to grow as well as their omnivorous counterparts. Adults who choose to become vegetarian at mature age are less susceptible to the health downfalls of the diet. But young children who are raised in a vegetarian household are lacking serious nutrients necessary for proper growth.

Vegetarians who eat no animal flesh or dairy products risk vitamin B12 deficiency, which can result in irreversible nerve deterioration. The need for vitamin B12 increases during pregnancy, breast-feeding, and the period of adolescence growth. Vegetarians with high nutrient needs, such as athletes and pregnant women, especially need these lacked vitamins. And not receiving all of these vitamins can be detrimental to one’s health.

Also, ovo-vegetarians, who eat eggs but no dairy foods or animal flesh, may have inadequate vitamin D and calcium. Inadequate vitamin D may cause rickets in children, while inadequate calcium can contribute to the risk of osteoporosis in later years. These vegetarians are susceptible to iron deficiency anemia because they are only missing the more readily absorbed iron from animal flesh. A vegetarian diet needs to be looked at with extreme scrutiny, as not to endanger one’s health.

Ecological arguments against omnivorous and carnivorous eating habits are little more than an attempt by those from the less popular “animal rights” movement to riding the coattails of the more popular environmental movement. In some cases, warnings of impending environmental cataclysm are used to advance an ethical agenda. However, arguments to the effect that eating meat is destroying the planet overlook that the planet has not yet been destroyed despite millions of years of omnivorous and carnivorous eating by millions of individuals from a multitude of species.

Carnivores make up the majority of the food chain, both human and animal. The Second Law of Thermodynamics dictates that some energy will be inevitably lost as one moves up the food web. Therefore, arguments about how it takes ‘X’ pounds of plant protein to generate ‘Y’ pounds of meat have a sound theoretical basis. However, these arguments are often overstated. These arguments falsely assume that pork chops and steak are the only products of animal agriculture.

They falsely presume that a pound of animal foodstuffs is nutritionally and energetically equivalent to a pound of plant foodstuffs. These arguments also ignore the energy content and opportunity cost of replacing animal by-products, which is considerable. Even the animal’s excrement is a valuable resource. Certain animal products, such as fetal calf serum, collagen, and laminin are crucial for medical research using cell cultures and have no available alternatives. Is saving a cow worth letting a human die? One can say “yes”, but what if he were the human that was ill?

And if certain practices associated with animal agriculture are found to be ecologically unsound, it does not merit a general opposition to eating meat. Though not practical for everyone, hunting and fishing bypass any potential ecological destruction associated with plant or animal agriculture. They are thus two of the most ecologically sound ways to obtain one’s sustenance. Those who would oppose even limited exploitation of these alternatives have ethical concerns masquerading as environmental concerns.

The most disingenuous ecological ploy made by “ethical” vegetarians is the “…we could feed X starving people with Y percent of the resources devoted to animal agriculture…” argument. First, it falsely implies that humans are starving because of insufficient production capacity. World hunger is a result of the deficient distribution of food, not the deficient capacity for the production of food. Our capacity to produce grain is so vast that we actually pay farmers not to produce. Secondly, if the argument were valid, the resultant increase in the human population would worsen rather than remedy ecological concerns regarding the human population.

Though vegetarianism does offer clear health benefits, such as the diet has been known to commonly cure coronary heart disease (coupled with medication), one need not become vegetarian in order to be healthy. Diet is only one important aspect of health. The avoidance of harmful habits such as smoking is as important, if not more so. A vegetarian diet is not necessarily always healthier than a diet consisting of meat. A very strict and regimented vegetarian diet is needed to acquire all essential nutrients for living well.

Meat does carry proteins and nutrients very helpful to a healthy diet. If eaten in moderation, the fats and cholesterols in meat can have minimal bad effects on the body. Eating meat is not always sucking down a greasy cheeseburger. A balanced diet’s definition does include meat. If the diet is looked at with honest concern and responsibility, a diet including meat can be as healthy as a vegetarian diet.

 

Example 6

For a long time now many people have different views about smoking in public places. Smokers feel it is their right to smoke where and when they want. On the other hand, non-smokers feel smokers violate their rights and endanger their life. Smoking causes heart disease, lung cancer, and other serious illnesses. Cigarette smoking is the number one cause of lung cancer. A substantial number of lung cancers that occur in non-smokers can be attributed to involuntary smoking.

There are some parts in the United States where you can smoke in public places, on the other hand in New York there are designated areas. While some people feel that smoking in public places should remain since it is their right, smoking in public places should be banned because second-hand smoke will endanger non-smokers’ health and it pollutes the environment.

Smokers feel they have had the right to smoke in a public place for so long that it should not be taken away. Restaurants and businesses should be allowed to set their own smoking rules, based on the demands of the customers. Also, businesses may decrease if they do not allow smokers the right to smoke, especially bars and restaurants. The workplace is another problem for smokers, now they have to go outside even in the winter to have a cigarette, even though they used to be able to smoke inside. A strong supporter of smokers’ rights is Democratic Assemblyman Dick Floyd, who wanted to vote for a controversial smoker’s right bill. He feels it is not a smoking bill, it merely protects the people who use legal substances such as tobacco and alcohol in their homes from job discrimination.

However, smoking in public places is a danger to non-smokers’ health for the reason of passive or second-hand smoke. The public does not realize the significant hazards of passive smoking. A U.S environmental protection agency stated second-hand smoke is the third major cause of lung cancer in the United States. The simple separation of smokers within the same air space may reduce, but does not eliminate exposure to passive smoke.

In Arizona five thousand and six hundred Americans died in 1989 due to passive smoke. A recent federal Environmental protection agency reported on the dangers of second-hand smoke. They found this kills fifty-three thousand nonsmokers a year. By putting a smoke-free policy into effect, it will send a strong message about protecting health. Even though designated areas are set aside for smokers this does not really protect a non-smoker. The heating and air conditions do not filter out carcinogens well enough and the smoke drifts onto non-designated areas.

Finally, if public smoking is kept legalized we will have major problems facing the environment. One problem is a lot of people are irritated by tobacco smoke. A man named General C.Everett Knoop released a report saying that passive smoking when non-smokers breathe smoke in an enclosed area, it causes as many as five deaths a year. Smoking in a public place is an air pollutant and it can damage health in a number of ways. The four major health hazards fall into air, water, and noise pollution. Air pollution can lead to various forms of respiratory disease.

The main problem of smoking in a public place is indoor air pollution. Some of these problems that result in indoor air pollution is building ventilation that has been reduced to conserve energy, with the result that ventilation is simply inadequate. Combustion by-products from smoking tobacco have produced substances, smoke included, that contaminate indoor air. The problem affecting a person who is in a contaminated environment may result in coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, muscular aches, chills, headaches, fever, and fatigue. To solve this we have to have extra ventilation and keep designated areas in the public places if there are any.

Although some claim that smoking in a public place is their right and should be kept that, smoking in public places should not be legalized because it will endanger non-smokers from passive smoke and it pollutes our enviroment. The state of New York will remain restricting smoking to designated areas. Cigarettes are the most deadly habit, affecting the greatest number of people in the world today. A ban on public smoking would create a healthier country.

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Vegetarianism Essay. (2020, Nov 16). Retrieved November 23, 2020, from https://essayscollector.com/examples/vegetarianism-essay/



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