Searching for an essay?

Browse the database of more than 3800 essays donated by our community members!

Sleep Deprivation Essay

sleep deprivation essay

Example #1

The man was placed on the earth with the basic instinct to survive in a dangerous world. One of these instincts was to rest every day for a period of time while the sun was down. Today, with our advancements in science and medicine, sleep remains to be one of those basic instincts still to be explained. Mosby s Medical, Nursing, & Allied Health Dictionary defines sleep as a state marked by reduced consciousness, diminished activity of the skeletal muscles, and depressed metabolism (Mosby NP). This definition gives insight into the perspective of sleep by defining it as a state of relaxation within the body. However, what does it do? What higher purpose does it serve? The science behind sleep remains a mystery, but the effects of it and the deprivation of sleep on the body, are displayed daily as an influence in the performance of youths during the day.

An enigma, wrapped within a puzzle comes to mind when thinking of sleep. Sleep is not a tangible object that can be caged and studied. It is more of a concept to be understood. An animal can live without sleep just as long as it can survive without eating (Dahl 354). This fact points out just how important sleep is when considering it a necessity, equal to the necessity of eating. One-third of most people s lives are spent asleep, or attempting to sleep (Swanson 96). Facts such as these show little insight into sleep, but show how far science has come in its understanding of the concepts concerning it. Science and technology have attempted to push beyond these concepts by continuing to ask why designing new experiments to answer their questions. This method of questioning has allowed for an understanding of what sleep is, and how it works.

Writing service

Conditions

Website

essaypro

[Rated 4.9]

Prices start at $12
Min. deadline 6 hours
Writers: ESL
Refund: Yes


Payment methods: VISA, MasterCard, American Express

extraessay

[Rated 4.8]

Prices start at $11
Min. deadline 3 hours
Writers: ESL, ENL
Refund: Yes


Payment methods: VISA, MasterCard, American Express, Discover

extraessay

[Rated 4.75]

Prices start at $10
Min. deadline 3 hours
Writers: ESL, ENL
Refund: Yes


Payment methods: VISA, MasterCard, JCB, Discover

Researchers have broken the science of sleep into two types that can be measured by brain waves. One phase of sleep called REM (rapid eye movement) sleep is named for the spastic movement of the eyes under the eyelids. Another name for REM sleep is active sleep (Gottlieb 80). REM sleep occurs mostly in the morning hours and is when dreaming occurs. The other type of sleep is called NREM (non-rapid eye movement) sleep, which leaves a sense of refreshment to the body. NREM sleep is also called quiet sleep (Gottlieb 81). Stages of sleep alternate between REM and NREM states that are characterized by brain waves, muscle activity, eye movements, heart function, and breathing (Cohen 8). These characteristics can be measured using observation, and sophisticated instruments such as an encephalography (Mosby NP). The encephalography measures brain waves and records them for analysis.

This is how stages are distinguished (Cohen 8). NREM has four stages that range from stage I, which is drowsiness, to stage IV, which is deep sleep (Gottlieb 81). Stage I is a short period that lasts about five minutes and is the transitional period from being drowsy to being asleep. Stage II is often called light sleep and lasts between ten to forty-five minutes (Cohen 8). Stage III begins the first instance of deep sleep; where the brain, heart, lungs, and muscles relax and slow down. Stage IV is described as the deepest sleep, and together with stage III lasts up to sixty minutes (Cohen 9). NREM occurrences include night terrors, sleeptalking, and sleepwalking (Gottlieb 81), which occur when a body wakes incompletely while they are not dreaming (Cohen 155). Researchers believe that memories are stored in long-term memory during REM sleep. This is due to the activity of nerve cells during REM sleep, which is active sleep (Cohen 9).

This understanding of sleep goes beyond the concepts of rest. By digging deeper, researchers have found many logical aspects of sleep that give us insight into understanding. With this understanding, we can see the aspects of health that stem from a resting body. Today, the health and welfare of the American youth have gone into a slump. One of the essential components of a healthy body is sleep, and today s teenagers just are not getting enough (Bates 32). As a body gets older, the necessities of sleep increases. During sleep, minor damage is repaired such as tissue damage, and minor pains(Cohen 5). This would be especially important for the scrapes and bruises that accompany outside activities for youths. Teenagers push their natural sleep onset later in the night (Bates 32). This is due to the urge of the adolescent to push their bedtime later in the evening (Weissbluth 39).

Teenagers need between nine to ten hours of sleep, but most teenagers are getting seven hours of sleep on average (Cohen 187). The main regulator of sleep in the body is the biological clock. It is not an actual body part, but a regulator of the circadian rhythm of the body. The circadian rhythm is the body s knowledge of the time of day, when it is time to sleep, and when it is time to wake (Cohen 6). The biological clock induces sleep using a chemical called melatonin. This chemical sets the time to go to sleep by relaxing the body, putting it to rest. Other chemicals and hormones are also released during sleep that is vital to the growth and sexual maturation (Brownlee 54). To growing adolescents, the excretion of these hormones is important in healthy growth and development. This ideal stresses the importance of obtaining sufficient sleep each night for teenagers.

Unfortunately, the most common sleep disorder among teenagers is a sleep phase shift (Cohen 189). One phase is equal to the normal hours of sleep in which one sleeps in a twenty-four hour period, such as, from ten o clock p.m. to seven o clock a.m. When this time is cut off to go to school, the phase is shifted into another time (Cohen 190). This shift is also known as a phase delay (Bates 32). It is similar to what travelers call jet lag when the body readjusts to the times in a new setting. At the turn of adolescence, night sleep changes in stage III and stage IV of NREM sleep with a decrease in the time spent in each stage (Cohen 187). This means a biological decrease in the deep stages of sleep that leave one refreshed and rejuvenated. The problem with this is that older people do not get enough good sleep and have to spend more time sleeping. Many studies are now being produced to show this, and stress the importance of additional sleep.

The University of Chicago performed a study that showed a relationship between teens that get fewer than four hours of sleep a night, and an added risk of various disorders such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and memory loss ( Lack of Sleep 29). An asleep researcher by the name of Eve Van Canter had to say, People try to sleep as little as possible and do as many things as possible, but our study is telling us that chronic sleep loss may increase the severity of widespread age-related chronic conditions, such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and cognitive defects ( Lack of Sleep 29). The aspect of sleep affecting our health is a real issue that most Americans face. In the end, a healthy body needs a multitude of hours of rest. Ms. Canter s statement shows how sleep can have dangerous effects on our lives when we do not do it responsibly.

Sleep deprivation may be defined as the interference of the basic physiologic urge to sleep, which is governed by the sleep centers (Mosby NP). Most Americans are sleep deprived (Swanson 96). This statement holds too true in describing the general American public. If you need an alarm clock to wake up in the morning, you are not getting enough sleep states Mark Mahowald, director of the Minnesota Regional Sleep Disorders Center in Minneapolis (Swanson 96). Most people would not wake up in time for the day s activities if they had no alarm. This is not good in the fact that one has to force one’s self out of sleep to do their daily activity. This state leaves a person in an automatic sleep mode where they are seemingly functional, but not all awake. The point in case would be a night reader who reads what is on the page at night but does not comprehend what he or she reads (Bates 32). When a person puts him/herself in the hectic lifestyles we lead, it pushes their limits on how long they can stay awake. Unfortunately, no anti-sleep aid can prevent sleep. When the body reaches its limits, it goes to sleep.

For teens, this problem is a major concern. In the pursuit to educate, we often seem to dismiss those students who tend not to do so well, and who fall asleep. Melatonin, the biological clock chemical that induces sleep, has been found in high levels among active teenagers in high school (Brownlee 54). In addition, school is not a stimulating environment for all students, and boredom makes sleepiness apparent (Swanson 96). This leaves students in a battle to combat tiredness in the day (Cohen 5). Some students resort to hyperactivity and difficult behavior in class (Cohen 5), while others respond with silliness, impulsive behavior, and depression (Dahl 354). These behaviors complicate and disrupt classroom learning for all students. The Lack of REM specific sleep has been shown to lower alertness, and reaction time (Brownlee 54). This could be a crucial point in considering the driving behaviors of high school students. In a study performed on high school students, seventeen percent of one hundred and sixty-six students have reported falling asleep at the wheel.

It is also shown that thirty-five percent of the students reported that they felt sleep deprivation impaired their driving ability (Lamberg 859). With this thought in mind, one is amazed when considering how many students drive to school in the mornings, and who drive home late from various high school events and activities that occur late in the evening. Another question being asked is how does sleep deprivation effect grades in the classroom. The A and B students generally go to bed earlier than the D and F students (Lamberg 859). On average, students in the higher-grade category obtained thirty-five more minutes of sleep than in the lower grade category. The issue behind this goes back to REM sleep. When teens wake up before their biological clocks have instructed, they miss out on the very important REM part of their sleep cycle. REM sleep boosts memory and learning, sends chemicals to integrate important information into the long-term memory, and resets the short-term memory (Brownlee 54).

Sleep deprivation has shown its power in our society by keeping a constant hold on its people. A cause of this deprivation of sleep can also be pointed at the phase delay or phase shift as mentioned. When a student goes to bed at ten to eleven o clock p.m. as his/her body naturally pushes, the time to wake up would be from seven to eight o clock a.m. However, because of school, and other early morning activities, most teens must wake up at six o clock in the morning to make their seven o clock bells (Lamberg 895). This strain on student life alone is abundant, causing countless hours of sleep loss. It would seem to be easy to tell students to go to bed earlier, but this would contradict the biological clock, which has set itself to a specific time later than what would be needed (Lamberg 899).

The mysteries behind the science of sleep remain to be an enigma. The effects of sleep, the deprivation of sleep on the body, and how it ultimately influences the performance of youths during the day is one mystery that has now been uncovered. The lack of sleep is profoundly shown in the day-to-day lives of most people. Performances at school, work, and home can be effected by how one has slept the night before. When the first man arrived on earth he was given a set of instincts that went toward one goal, survival. This goal has only been aggravated by the need for sleep, for it left man vulnerable, for hours in the night. From this dilemma evolved the first house for protection while sleep.

Then came the first bed for a comfortable sleep, and so forth until there was the first electroencephalograph that measured brain waves to explain sleep. The evolution of man did not derive from sleep, but the questioning and deep understanding of the desired form has allowed man to push his limits. However, have we gone too far? Has the desire to know to push our sleeping habits to the brink of elimination? Can the children of today cope with a society that is constantly going, never stopping for sleep? These questions have yet to be answered, but there are facts well known. The sleeping habits of adolescents will have to change in order for us to lead healthy lives. The youth of America are in fact sleep deprived. The only question left is what will be done about it.

 

Example #2

What do the effects of sleep deprivation have on people? When a person does not get enough sleep, he or she is depriving his or her body of something that it needs. A delightful sleep is one of the most satisfying human experiences with a role to play in supporting a good mood and cognitive acuity as well as in promoting physiologic balance and resilience (Chittora, Jain, and Suhalka). People think because they get an insufficient number of hours of sleep, they will not have an emotional impact by it. Sleep is a required need for peoples’ day to day life to be able to perform and stay healthy emotionally and physically. The effects of sleep deprivation are an issue because it affects mood, performance, and health.

There have been reports which have said sleep deprivation not only increases sleepiness but also accelerates the deterioration of mood (Kaida and Niki). Sleep and mood are closely connected; poor or inadequate sleep can be the source of irritability and anxiety, while healthy sleep can enhance well-being (Sleep and Mood). Therefore, sleep is crucial to have a pleasant mood and outlook on life on a daily basis. The typical adult requires about seven to eight hours of sleep each night to have good well-being. University of Pennsylvania researchers found that subjects who were restricted to only four and a half hours of sleep a night for one week reported feeling more stressed, angry, sad, and mentally exhausted (Sleep and Mood).

 

Example #3

One of the most common and high-risk disorders among college students is sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation is when one does not obtain the full amount of sleep that is required for the body to function properly. Young adults need about six to eight hours of sleep in order to function properly, but some college students do not get to sleep the full six to eight hours in one sleep session. There has been a wide range of concern on whether or not people are performing at their highest potential in their day to day lives or if that performance is somehow interrupted due to this insufficient sleep.

Buboltz, Brown, and Soper (2001) found that trouble waking up in the morning, taking more than thirty minutes to fall asleep, and daytime sleepiness was more of the common types of sleep difficulties. Due to inadequate sleep students get during the night, they tend to take naps in the middle of the day (Ye, Johnson, Keane, Manasia, & Gregas, 2015). Most college students often surrender their sleep during the week and make up for it by sleeping longer on the weekends (Pilcher & Walters, 1997), but they actually do not get more sleep. Sleep deprivation comes with many risks such as impaired cognitive performance, behavioral changes, and health issues. This paper will review research on sleep deprivation and inadequate sleeping patterns such as napping to make up for the loss of sleep.

 

Example #4

It’s seven-thirty in the morning, the time that most American high schools begin class. Instead of being chipper and ready to learn, most teenagers, at this time of the morning, can barely remain awake. These puffy-eyed pupils are by no means ready to learn. Sixty percent of children under 18 reported being sleepy during the day, with another fifteen percent reporting that they had fallen asleep during the school day within the past year (National Sleep Foundation, Dozing). Though adolescents require a larger amount of sleep than younger children, they usually receive much less (Indiana University Center for Adolescent Studies). The amount of sleep a teenager receives affects him or her both physically and mentally.

Sleep-deprived teenagers are more likely to be irritable, be depressed, not perform up to their capabilities in school, and have a decreased ability to handle complex tasks (National Parent Information Network). Though teenage sleep deprivation is a big problem, some simple solutions such as rescheduling the school day to fit teenagers? biological needs, setting consistent sleep schedules, and teaching children the importance of proper sleep habits can easily remedy this problem. In order to avoid sleep deprivation, maintaining a consistent sleep schedule is vital for teenagers. Compared to opposing age groups, teenagers are most easily affected by inconsistent sleep habits (National Sleep Foundation, Adapt).

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) reports that, For the adolescent’s circadian clock to stay on track, it is essential that teens remain on schedule (National Sleep Foundation, Adapt). The NSF also recommends that teens only stay up one hour later on weekends than they would during the school week (National Sleep Foundation, Adapt). Additionally, sleeping in late on the weekends is of no benefit to teens, as extra sleep on the weekend does nothing to counteract the effects of sleep deprivation (National Parent Information Network). Another way to combat teenage sleep deprivation is through providing better education on the matter. The information that most teenagers receive on the affects of sleep deprivation is minimal.

For example, through a North Carolina state study showed that most sleep-related automobile accidents involve individuals under the age of 25 (National Sleep Foundation, Crashes), sixty percent of parents with children old enough to drive admitted that they hadn’t discussed the danger of falling asleep at the wheel with their child (National Sleep Foundation, Dozing). Between seventy-three and eighty-five percent of parents believe that their children should receive just as much time learning about good sleep habits at school as they do learning about exercise and nutrition (National Sleep Federation, Dozing). Sleep experts feel really strongly that high school timings are out of sync with the natural circadian rhythms of adolescents, commented Michele Kipke, head of the National Academy of Science’s Board on Children, Youth and Families (Kaufman).

One way to correct this inconsistency would be to start the school day later. Because of their unique sleep needs, teenagers’ brains are not ready to be alert until long after the typical high school day has begun, said Richard Gelula, Nation Sleep Foundation Executive (National Sleep Foundation, Adapt). Most high schools in the United States begin school between 7:15 and 7:45 (Kaufman). This is a problem because teenagers require around nine hours of sleep per night but oftentimes cannot fall asleep until eleven at night (Kaufman). Gelula added that even teens who get the correct amount of sleep, because of their internal clock, tend to be sleepy in the mid-morning and alert later in the mid-afternoon (National Sleep Foundation, Adapt).

Responding to recent research on teenage sleep, many school districts have changed their starting times to later in the morning, most notably in Minneapolis, where high schools now begin class at eight-thirty A.M. (National Parent Information Network). By making sure teenagers maintain regular sleep habits, educating teens on the importance of getting enough sleep, and beginning school later in the morning, the problem of teenage sleep deprivation can easily be corrected. Most teens are ignorant of the effects of sleep deprivation, and even those who are aware choose not to follow the recommendations. In both cases, they are only hurting themselves. Though getting the proper amount of sleep can be inconvenient, it is indispensable for reaching one’s full potential.

 

Example #5

The functioning of the human body is influenced by a number of factors, which are mainly determined by the health status of an individual. Oftentimes, we seek medication, when the body deviates from its normal and usual functioning mechanisms. Through different activities and processes, the body is able to use energy and replenish itself. Sleeping is one of the activities, which have a direct effect on the functioning of the body. While most people do not understand the implication of sleep, our effectiveness solely depends on the amount of time dedicated to sleeping (Van 1455). However, due to some reasons, people fail to get enough sleep, daily, weekly, or on a regular basis. Sleep deprivation has become a major problem in the United States today, with a wide range of negative effects among youths and adults.

This paper discusses the issue of sleep deprivation, focusing on its definition, causes, effects, and possible ways of dealing with it. Sleep deprivation is defined as a condition, which occurs among human beings when they fail to get enough sleep. Many experts argue that sleep deficiency is wide even though most people do not consider it to be a serious issue, which affects their lives (Colten and Altevogt 94). Sleep deprivation has become a major problem in the United States, with almost forty-seven million suffering from the condition. Among other reasons, one may get insufficient sleep in a day as a result of various factors. Some people sleep at the wrong time, due to busy daily schedules while others have sleep disorders, which affect their sleeping patterns. The following segment of the paper discusses the causes of deprivation.

Sleep deprivation may occur as a result of factors, which are not known to the victims. This is based on the fact that sleep deprivation may go beyond the number of hours one spends in bed. In some cases, the quality of sleep matters in determining the level of deprivation (Colten and Altevogt 94). In this context, it is possible for one to be in bed for more than eight hours but suffer from the negative effects of sleep deprivation. Whilst this is the case, there are people who wake every morning feeling tired despite having spent the recommended number of hours in bed. Sleep deprivation can be caused by medical conditions, which may include but not limited to asthma, arthritis, muscle cramps, allergies, and muscular pain. These conditions have been classified by researchers as common medical conditions that largely contribute to most of the cases of sleep deprivation being witnessed in the United States (Colten and Altevogt 94).

Similarly, these medical conditions have a direct impact on not only the quality but also the time one takes in bed sleeping. It is worth noting that sometimes people are usually unconscious to realize that their sleep is not deep enough. This also explains the reason why it is not easy for a person to recall any moment in life when he or she moved closer to waking up. Treatment of cases like sleep apnea is important because it affects the quality of sleep without necessarily awakening the victim. This is because medical surveys have revealed the fatal effects of sleep apnea, especially on the cardiovascular system. Besides these, one is likely to experience breathing difficulties, caused by insufficient oxygen (Bernstein 150). Even though the treatment of sleep deprivation is important, it has been found that some drugs used to treat patients may worsen the case, or lead to poor quality of sleep.

It is therefore necessary for the doctor to determine the best drugs to use. Discussions between doctors and victims are imperative in order to understand the response of patients. Sleep deprivation is also caused by sleep cycle disruptions, which interfere with the fourth stage of sleep. Oftentimes, these disruptions are described as night terrors, sleepwalking, and nightmares (Bernstein 150). Though these disorders are known not to awaken a person completely, it is vital to note that they may disrupt the order of sleep cycles, forcing a person to move from the fourth stage to the first one. Victims of these disruptions require attention in order to take corrective measures.

In addition, there are known environmental factors, which contribute to several cases of sleep deprivation. However, doctors argue that the impact of the environment is sometimes so minimal to be recognized by people who are affected by sleep deficiency. In other words, these factors affect the quality of sleep without necessarily arousing a person from sleep. Common examples include extreme weather conditions, like high temperatures, noise, and poor quality of the mattress. As a result, they may contribute to a person’s awakening, depending on their intensity when one is sleeping (Bernstein 150). Moreover, the impact of these factors may develop with time, thus affecting one’s quality of sleep.

In addition, most of the environmental factors, which contribute to sleep deprivation, can be fixed easily, without medical or professional skills. Nevertheless, the challenge is usually how to become aware of their existence. Lastly, sleep deprivation is caused by stress and depression, which have been linked to other health disorders and complications. Together with some lifestyles in America, these factors are heavily contributing to sleep deficiency in most parts of the world. Even though they might not be acute to awaken an individual, their cumulative effects usually become significant. There are countless stressors in the world, which affect youths and adults (Wells and Vaughn 233).

While young people could be concerned with passing exams, adults are normally preoccupied with pressure to attain certain goals in life. These conditions create a disturbed mind, which may affect a person’s ability to enjoy quality sleep. Sleep deprivation has a host of negative effects, which affect people of all ages. The commonest effect is stress. Most people who suffer from sleep deficiency are likely to experience depression frequently as compared to their counterparts who enjoy quality sleep. As a result, stress may lead to poor performance among students at school. Research has revealed that students who spend very few hours in bed or experience disruptions during sleep are likely to register poor performance in their class assignments and final exams (Wells and Vaughn 233). Additionally, sleep deprivation causes inefficiency among employees.

For instance, drivers who experience this disorder are more likely to cause accidents as compared to those who are free from it. This is based on the fact that un-refreshed people have poor concentration and low mastery of their skills. Besides stress and anxiety, sleep deprivation has a wide range of health-related effects. For instance, medical experts argue that people who spend less than six hours in bed are likely to suffer from high blood pressure. Quality sleep gives the body an opportunity to rest by slowing down the rate at which it pumps blood to the rest of the body. Inadequate sleep implies that the heart has to work without its normal and recommended rest. Additionally, sleep deprivation is known to affect the immune system.

People who experience this disorder end up with a weakened immune system, leaving the body prone to most illnesses. This reduced immune response accumulates and may become fatal with time. Sleep paralysis is also a common effect of inadequate sleep (Wells and Vaughn 233). This is due to the disruption of the sleep cycle. It primarily occurs when the body is aroused during the fourth stage of the sleep cycle. In this case, the body is left immobile, as the mind regains consciousness. Due to this conflict, one may experience pain and hallucinations. Based on the negative effects of sleep deprivation, there is a need to manage this disorder among Americans. Firstly, it is necessary for people to seek medical advice concerning certain factors, which could be contributing to this condition, like stress and infections.

Proper counseling is also vital in stabilizing a person’s mental capacity. Physical exercises are also known to relieve a person from stressful conditions, contributing to sleep deficiency (Van 1455). Lastly, it is essential to ensure that the environment is free from noise and has regulated weather conditions. Sleep deprivation remains a major problem in America, affecting millions of people. As discussed above, sleep deprivation is caused by a host of factors, ranging from environmental to health-related issues. Moreover, sleep deficiency has countless effects, most of which may become fatal in cases where the disorder is chronic.

 

Example #6

In today s busy lifestyle, the days are just not long enough to get everything done. Getting the correct amount of sleep is important to not only be healthy but also to live safely, as many Americans may not know the severity of sleep deprivation. The human body requires sleep to regenerate, and a lack of causes it to function abnormally. High school and college students generally need more sleep than adults, but on average sleep less than the 9 hours recommended. Time schedules and hectic lifestyles cause sleep deficiencies. What people may not know is how dangerous it can be to not get enough sleep. If you find yourself taping your eyelids open, and yawning all day, you may need to reschedule your time to get more sleep!

The exact cause of sleep is still unknown to scientists, however many theories on how and why we sleep are in circulation. For example, sleep could be a way to sort thoughts and memories or to give our immune system a chance to catch up. In addition, sleep could be a way to prevent the brain from overheating, build neurons, and our body to manufacture proteins. Furthermore, scientists believe that sleep is a way to restock depleted glucose levels that the brain needs to function. Most everyone has been caught a few times with bags under their eyes, but over time Americans have continued to push deprivation to the extreme. For example, students have more pressure on them to do well in school, as competition continues to rise for degrees ext.

Staying up late to finish homework and study is common these days. In addition, hobbies and sports deprive young people of the sleep they might need to become fully rested. Scholarships may be the only hope for some people to get an education past high school, and this demands early morning or late night practices and studying. Furthermore, social lives force most young adults to stay out late on weekends, and then sleep on Saturdays and Sunday mornings, throwing their sleeping patters off even more. Whether you are aware of it or not, sleep deprivation is dangerous. In a survey across America, 62% of the population admitted to driving drowsy, and 27 % further admitted to falling asleep behind the wheel at least once in the past year. As it only takes a split second to cause an accident, being a victim to a sleepy driver would not be an enjoyable experience.

Not to mention that sleep-deprived people are moody, filled with malaise, have poor concentration, and are susceptible to illnesses. Research has also shown that sleep deficiency not only has a negative impact on work output but also takes away from people’s will to perform the task hand. In addition, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) estimates that approximately 100,000 police-reported crashes annually (about 1.5% of all crashes) involve drowsiness or fatigue as a principal factor in the accident. It s unfortunate to lose 1,500 people in the U.S. alone to a situation that can be easily avoided with such a simple function as sleep (4% of all traffic crash fatalities are sleep related). At least 71,000 people are injured in fall-asleep crashes each year. The NHTSA estimates these crashes represent $12.5 billion each year.

Furthermore, laws are being placed to prevent sleepy drivers from getting on the road. This is because deprivations mimic drunkenness, and slows down drivers’ reaction time to nothing in many cases. Although being ticketed for driving under an *existed* state of mind would be a hassle and inconvenience, it would help to save lives. Good sleeping patterns not only promote good health but also prevent accidents from occurring. Sleeping properly and regularly, allows your brain to perform at maximum capacity. If at all possible scheduling time to get the most out of every day, including 8 to 9 hours of sleep is very important. If not for yourself, sleep properly to prevent the distress on others that may occur from an accident. You may not notice your mistake, but a death certificate leaves an erasable mark on families.

 

Example #7

The functioning of the human body is influenced by a number of factors, which are mainly determined by the health status of an individual. Oftentimes, we seek medication, when the body deviates from its normal and usual functioning mechanisms. Through different activities and processes, the body is able to use energy and replenish itself. Sleeping is one of the activities, which have a direct effect on the functioning of the body. While most people do not understand the implication of sleep, our effectiveness solely depends on the amount of time dedicated to sleeping (Van 1455). However, due to some reasons, people fail to get enough sleep, daily, weekly, or on a regular basis.

Sleep deprivation has become a major problem in the United States today, with a wide range of negative effects among youths and adults. This paper discusses the issue of sleep deprivation, focusing on its definition, causes, effects, and possible ways of dealing with it. Sleep deprivation is defined as a condition, which occurs among human beings when they fail to get enough sleep. Many experts argue that sleep deficiency is wide even though most people do not consider it to be a serious issue, which affects their lives (Colten and Altevogt 94). Sleep deprivation has become a major problem in the United States, with almost forty-seven million suffering from the condition.

Among other reasons, one may get insufficient sleep in a day as a result of various factors. Some people sleep at the wrong time, due to busy daily schedules while others have sleep disorders, which affect their sleeping patterns. The following segment of the paper discusses the causes of deprivation. Sleep deprivation may occur as a result of factors, which are not known to the victims. This is based on the fact that sleep deprivation may go beyond the number of hours one spends in bed. In some cases, the quality of sleep matters in determining the level of deprivation (Colten and Altevogt 94).

In this context, it is possible for one to be in bed for more than eight hours but suffer from the negative effects of sleep deprivation. Whilst this is the case, there are people who wake every morning feeling tired despite having spent the recommended number of hours in bed. Sleep deprivation can be caused by medical conditions, which may include but not limited to asthma, arthritis, muscle cramps, allergies, and muscular pain. These conditions have been classified by researchers as common medical conditions that largely contribute to most of the cases of sleep deprivation being witnessed in the United States (Colten and Altevogt 94).

Similarly, these medical conditions have a direct impact on not only the quality but also the time one takes in bed sleeping. It is worth noting that sometimes people are usually unconscious to realize that their sleep is not deep enough. This also explains the reason why it is not easy for a person to recall any moment in life when he or she moved closer to waking up. Treatment of cases like sleep apnea is important because it affects the quality of sleep without necessarily awakening the victim. This is because medical surveys have revealed the fatal effects of sleep apnea, especially on the cardiovascular system. Besides these, one is likely to experience breathing difficulties, caused by insufficient oxygen (Bernstein 150).

Even though the treatment of sleep deprivation is important, it has been found that some drugs used to treat patients may worsen the case, or lead to poor quality of sleep. It is therefore necessary for the doctor to determine the best drugs to use. Discussions between doctors and victims are imperative in order to understand the response of patients. Sleep deprivation is also caused by sleep cycle disruptions, which interfere with the fourth stage of sleep. Oftentimes, these disruptions are described as night terrors, sleepwalking, and nightmares (Bernstein 150). Though these disorders are known not to awaken a person completely, it is vital to note that they may disrupt the order of sleep cycles, forcing a person to move from the fourth stage to the first one. Victims of these disruptions require attention in order to take corrective measures.

In addition, there are known environmental factors, which contribute to several cases of sleep deprivation. However, doctors argue that the impact of the environment is sometimes so minimal to be recognized by people who are affected by sleep deficiency. In other words, these factors affect the quality of sleep without necessarily arousing a person from sleep. Common examples include extreme weather conditions, like high temperatures, noise, and poor quality of the mattress. As a result, they may contribute to a person’s awakening, depending on their intensity when one is sleeping (Bernstein 150). Moreover, the impact of these factors may develop with time, thus affecting one’s quality of sleep.

In addition, most of the environmental factors, which contribute to sleep deprivation, can be fixed easily, without medical or professional skills. Nevertheless, the challenge is usually how to become aware of their existence. Lastly, sleep deprivation is caused by stress and depression, which have been linked to other health disorders and complications. Together with some lifestyles in America, these factors are heavily contributing to sleep deficiency in most parts of the world. Even though they might not be acute to awaken an individual, their cumulative effects usually become significant. There are countless stressors in the world, which affect youths and adults (Wells and Vaughn 233).

While young people could be concerned with passing exams, adults are normally preoccupied with pressure to attain certain goals in life. These conditions create a disturbed mind, which may affect a person’s ability to enjoy quality sleep. Sleep deprivation has a host of negative effects, which affect people of all ages. The commonest effect is stress. Most people who suffer from sleep deficiency are likely to experience depression frequently as compared to their counterparts who enjoy quality sleep. As a result, stress may lead to poor performance among students at school. Research has revealed that students who spend very few hours in bed or experience disruptions during sleep are likely to register poor performance in their class assignments and final exams (Wells and Vaughn 233). Additionally, sleep deprivation causes inefficiency among employees.

For instance, drivers who experience this disorder are more likely to cause accidents as compared to those who are free from it. This is based on the fact that un-refreshed people have poor concentration and low mastery of their skills. Besides stress and anxiety, sleep deprivation has a wide range of health-related effects. For instance, medical experts argue that people who spend less than six hours in bed are likely to suffer from high blood pressure. Quality sleep gives the body an opportunity to rest by slowing down the rate at which it pumps blood to the rest of the body. Inadequate sleep implies that the heart has to work without its normal and recommended rest. Additionally, sleep deprivation is known to affect the immune system.

People who experience this disorder end up with a weakened immune system, leaving the body prone to most illnesses. This reduced immune response accumulates and may become fatal with time. Sleep paralysis is also a common effect of inadequate sleep (Wells and Vaughn 233). This is due to the disruption of the sleep cycle. It primarily occurs when the body is aroused during the fourth stage of the sleep cycle. In this case, the body is left immobile, as the mind regains consciousness. Due to this conflict, one may experience pain and hallucinations. Based on the negative effects of sleep deprivation, there is a need to manage this disorder among Americans. Firstly, it is necessary for people to seek medical advice concerning certain factors, which could be contributing to this condition, like stress and infections.

Proper counseling is also vital in stabilizing a person’s mental capacity. Physical exercises are also known to relieve a person from stressful conditions, contributing to sleep deficiency (Van 1455). Lastly, it is essential to ensure that the environment is free from noise and has regulated weather conditions. Sleep deprivation remains a major problem in America, affecting millions of people. As discussed above, sleep deprivation is caused by a host of factors, ranging from environmental to health-related issues. Moreover, sleep deficiency has countless effects, most of which may become fatal in cases where the disorder is chronic.

 

Example #8

In today’s modern society, the average college student is sleep deprived more than ever. Sleep deprivation is the situation or condition of suffering from a lack of sleep. Sleep deprivation is real, and only researchers are the only ones who know it is a big problem throughout colleges and universities worldwide. Sleep deprivation has many factors leading to it but also has just as many effects. Within the articles Awareness of effects of sleep deprivation among college students. by Abigail Nirandhi Ranasinghe, R. Gayathri, and V. Vishnu Priya; Sleep Quality and Academic Performance in University Students: A Wake-Up Call for College Psychologists. by Steven P. Gilbert and Cameron C. Weaver; Association of Stress, General Health, and Alcohol Use with Poor Sleep Quality among U.S. College Students. by Teresa D. Valerio, Myoung Jin Kim, and Kathy Sexton-Radek; and Impact of a sleep course on sleep, mood and anxiety symptoms in college students: A pilot study. by Angelina Baroni, Jean-Marie Bruzzese, Christina A. Di Bartolo, Adam Ciarleglio, and Jess P. Shatkin; all explain the many different reasons why college students aren’t getting enough sleep.

The articles mentioned in the paper all discuss results, the results are the problems that are causing college students to have poor sleep quality. Some impacts on sleep deprivation can be mental and emotional health, sleep quality, and sleep problems. Students need to know how important sleep is and why they need more sleep than what they perceive they need. Disturbed or insufficient sleep is common among college students, with 70% of the students attaining insufficient sleep, 50% reporting daytime sleepiness, and more than 30% reporting severe sleep difficulties (Baroni, A., Bruzzese, J., Di Bartolo, C. A., Ciarleglio, A., & Shatkin, J. P., 41-50). Numerous studies throughout the world have been conducted on sleep deprivation and how college students can be affected. The research was conducted by using surveys and recording activities that were done before going to sleep, as well as after. All the researchers included in the numerous studies focused on many different variables, but only the ones that affected students the most.

The results from the three different studies had some similarities but also differences, but nothing major. This paper is going to examine the purpose of the studies and to better understand what common factors can lead to sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation can affect both your mental and emotional health, which can lead to more severe consequences. Teresa D. Valerio’s, Myoung Jin Kim’s, and Kathy Sexton-Radek’s study focused on college students throughout the world and associated them with behaviors and functions that impacted their sleep quality. Behaviors that were taken into consideration were alcohol, cigarette, and drug use, as well as, how your general health was functioning. The amount of sleep can affect your sleep quality which can be foundational to emotional health. When the amount of sleep needed was not reached, students became stressed because they felt as if they were behind due to not understanding the material in their classes. Students’ academics fell dramatically along with their quality of sleep, because of the late-night assignments that needed to be done (Valerio et al.).

Researchers want colleges to put on interventions to show students what late nights and less sleep does for them. Not only is their academic standing decreasing, but their overall long-term quality of life is dramatically decreasing as well. When your long-term quality of life is at risk, your mental and emotional states of health are at risk. In this study, researchers looked at how stressed students were beforehand and during the study. Stress levels increased, while sleep quality was decreasing causing their health to get out of balance. The results to this study affected Caucasian females, who were about twenty years of age, enrolled full-time, single, and not a member of a sorority the most (Valerio et al.). Sleep quality is a concern in colleges throughout the world, in this case, halfway across the world. Y. Y. Tsui, and Y. K. Wing, conducted a similar study, and their purpose was to investigate sleep problems and patterns of university students who were majoring in business at a Hong Kong University.

Having a study done on sleep quality in China shows that this is a major topic among the many universities throughout the world. Even though this is an older study, results showed that female students who are about the age of twenty are sleep deprived. Just like in the 2016 study, the results are similar and show that universities and colleges are not letting their students know how important it is to get a good night’s sleep (Tsui et al.). From the Tsui et al. study, further conclusions showed, that attending early morning lectures and living on-campus were the biggest factors of students being sleep deprived. The researchers that conducted this study on the University, wants schools to show their students the importance of sleep and time management so they do not become stressed. In this study, Decreased sleep quality has been linked to a variety of mental and physical problems, including feelings of depression, anxiety, and fatigue. As a result, there is a growing concern about university students’ sleep habits and problems especially in relation to their health and well-being (Y. Y. Tsui, and Y. K. Wing, p. 167).

The final study by Argelinda Baroni, Jean-Marie Bruzzese, Christina A. Di Bartolo, Adam Ciarleglio, and Jess P. Shatkin, was conducted to determine a student’s sleep course, and what was impacting the students sleep behaviors, mood, and anxiety. Students were studied by many different tests that needed to be taken throughout the course of the study. Results showed students who dropped out of the study and who did not. Among these two categories, the results were either significantly above the average or were right on the baseline of being average (Baroni et al.). Overall conclusions were based on what impacted the student’s sleep quality. Mental and emotional health statuses were big impacts due to increased levels of depression and anxiety. The researchers strongly suggested putting on interventions that sleep education and targeted cognitive behavioral skills can eliminate sleep problems and possibly the more severe effects. Lastly, there was more positive than negative data within the study. Students did show improvement in sleep parameters, mood, and anxiety when the study was concluded (Baroni et al.).

Finally, throughout the studies, there were noticeable similarities that needed to be brought to attention. Within the first two studies discussed, their commonalities were that females who were about the age of twenty were more sleep-deprived than others. Another similarity between the first two studies, was the time of day, whether it was staying up late doing work or getting up early for class, both had major impacts on the student’s sleep quality. The first and third studies that were discussed, really wanted college to put on interventions so that their students can be educated on why sleep is really important. The last study that was discussed, tied into the two others by having the same three main themes. These three themes were, impacts on mental and emotional health, sleep quality, and sleep problems.

 

Example #9 – An Overview of Sleep Deprivation and Its Effect on the Human Body

Sleep deprivation is the general term given to describe a state that occurs due to an inadequate amount of sleep or consistently low quality of sleep. Sleep is as vital to the human body as food or water, and an insufficient amount of sleep can have severe effects on both physical and mental health. Disruptions to the sleep cycle and circadian rhythms such as shift work or jet lag have consequences on how the body functions. A person who is sleep deprived is more likely to have impaired judgment, is accident-prone, and make decisions that could affect them negatively. An individual who has not slept for more than 24 hours has a severe lack of hand-eye coordination and suffers from similar symptoms to a person who has a blood-alcohol level of 0.1. Sleep deprivation is not only linked to physical health, but also to mental health and the way we perform daily tasks.

Sleep deprivation can occur due to multiple reasons. The most common reason for sleep deprivation is a personal choice. Many people chose to go to bed at a late hour after spending time socializing or watching television, causing a reduction in the amount of sleep they get. Another reason is an illness, as something such as tonsillitis can keep a person awake due to pain they are experiencing and they sleep poorly. Other reasons include sleep disorders such as insomnia or sleep apnea, a poor sleeping environment, or shift work. The topic of sleep deprivation on health-related to psychological principles through altered states of awareness, or often known as altered states of consciousness. Consciousness is the term given to a process by which the brain creates a model of internal and external experience. An altered state of awareness is the term that describes a state where thoughts and actions that differs from that of a normal conscious person.

Sensory overload, sleep deprivation and trauma can all lead to an altered state of awareness. A study conducted at Harvard University uncovered that a sleep-deprived brain can not be in control of its sensorimotor functions and can have long term negative affects. Circadian Rhythms are mental, physical, and behavioral changes that follow a 24-hour to 25-hour cycle, responding mainly to the light and darkness in the environment. Circadian Rhythms are found in most living things such as animals, humans, plants, and even tiny microbes. The study of Circadian Rhythms is called Chronobiology.

The body has more than 100 circadian rhythms. Each unique 24-hour cycle influences an aspect of your body’s function, including body temperature, hormone levels, heart rate, blood pressure, and even pain threshold. Scientists can’t explain how this helps your brain ‘keep time’ but they do know the brain relies on outside influences known as zeitgebers, to keep it on a 24-hour schedule. Exogenous Rhythms are regulated by external events in the environment. Endogenous rhythms are internally driven. External Factors associated with Circadian Rhythms:

  • Daylight – when daylight hits your eyes, cells in the retinas signal your brain
  • Sleep
  • Social Contact
  • Regular Meal Times
  • All of these things send timekeeping messages to your brain.

Sleep hygiene refers to habits and practices that are conducive to sleeping well on a regular basis and can be introduced through different situations such as a repetitive sleep-wake cycle. You sleep better when your temperature is lowest, which is common in the early hours of the morning between 4 and 6 am. You’re most likely to wake up when your temperature starts to rise, between 6 am and 8 am. As you age, your brains ‘pacemaker’ loses cells which changes your circadian rhythms – mainly noticeable in how you sleep. There are 5 stages of sleep. The first 4 stages of sleep are non REM (Rapid Eye movement). The fifth and final stage of sleep is REM (Rapid Eye Movement).

Each cycle lasts approximately 90 minutes, and each person experiences roughly 4-6 cycles per night. The first time through the cycle you only spend about 10 minutes in REM Sleep – which increases to 30 to 60 minutes by the last cycle. When a person suffers from sleep deprivation, they do not experience each stage of sleep and therefore do not get the benefits they would such as waking up feeling refreshed. There are both long term and short term effects that occur when a person does not get an adequate amount of sleep both with chronic sleep deprivation and partial sleep deprivation. Chronic sleep deprivation is where a person does not get enough sleep over an extended period of time and suffer from the effects long term. Partial sleep deprivation is the term given to a person who has some sleep during a 24-hour period but not enough to meet needs and may only occur occasionally.

In cases of extreme sleep deprivation, psychosis can occur, where a person experiences being desensitized to surroundings and at a loss of personal identity. They struggle to cope with people and the environment, however, this usually only occurs after 6 days of sleep deprivation. The most common short-term effects of sleep deprivation include anxiety, drowsiness, becoming easily distracted, decreased alertness and cognitive impairment, and severe stress. These symptoms occur as the sleepiness a person feels slows down their thought processes, putting them in an altered state of awareness. Concentration levels are lowered and it becomes more difficult to complete complex tasks. The nerve connections that make our memories are strengthened during sleep, and therefore sleep deprivation causes stress and forgetfulness.

Without sleep, anything learned or experienced over the day will not be embedded in short term memory. In addition to these short-term effects that severely alter an individual’s state of consciousness, long-term effects are even more dangerous. People who suffer from chronic sleep deprivation are more likely to experience anxiety disorders and depression. They are also at a higher risk of chronic health problems such as high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke. The interruption of circadian rhythms can lead to these problems and severely affect a person’s mental health and physical well-being.

 

Example #10 – interesting ideas

Problem and Solution essay on Sleep Deprivation? I have never written a problem and solution essay before, mine is on Sleep Deprivation. Im a little confused about how to tye in the solutions… and what could be a solution for sleep deprivation? A good paragraph about how I could do this?

Answer. Sleep deprivation has become a major problem for Americans. Over 100 million Americans today suffer from lack of sleep. This has been an ongoing problem throughout the centuries. People owe their bodies sleep and scientist are calling it a “Sleep debt”. An average American owes their body at least thirty hours of sleep. This lack of sleep is as hazardous as drunk driving.

One man caught sleep deprivation at it’s best. He pushed himself to the limits as much as possible. One day he went thirty hours without sleep and was on his way to his parents for supper. On his way to his parent’s house, he stopped on some railroad tracks and stared a train in the face until it hit him. He survived the incident with torn cartilage in his rib. It has been said that had he not had been deprived of the sleep his body needed, his reflexes would have told him that the train was going to hit him.


I need to write a paper and cant think off anything to argue about how sleep deprivation is good for you or something like that because everyone knows its harmful for you.

Answer. Why not focus on how sleep deprivation can sometimes make a person appear that they are drunk or are on drugs? I know I have suffered from hallucinations from not sleeping for several days. You can make the essay comical and focus on how much money people practicing sleep deprivation will save personally and for the government in health care costs. You could argue, “don’t do drugs just don’t sleep.”


Sleep Deprivation? How does sleep deprivation decrease/increase weight?

Answer. From what I have read — not witnessed — sleep deprivation puts the body into a state of stress that causes the metabolism to rise. It would decrease weight as it also makes the mind become dysfunctionally irrational. From what I have witnessed in myself, sleep deprivation also cancels out hunger in at least some circumstances. I became so stressed out trying to keep awake that ALL I wanted was to go to sleep, and I had not eaten either dinner or breakfast!

Now, deprivation is not the same as staying awake too long, which can cause “the hungry”. My sleep deprivation was mild, and it was due to a need to travel about 500 miles on an errand and then to return within a set amount of time which I just barely had time to do, and then to have to do homework for college! Not a good situation safety-wise for driving at the very least, and I miraculously caught myself waking up as I was driving on the shoulder of the road on my trip back! Good thing there were no parked cars on the side of the road!

As for sleep deprivation in captivity, such as at Guantanamo torture prison, I do not know the effects. It is hard to know those effects due to the total secrecy of our torture prisons. But I am sure it affects a lack of appetite in addition to all of the mental stress of being kept awake in captivity. Also, as for what Pretieyez4u said, less sleep in a domicile situation may lead to more snacking and overeating, I do not buy what she says from what she researched. Sounds like some researchers were making up their own answers without asking for real questions!

 

Cite this page

Choose cite format:
Sleep Deprivation Essay. (2021, Jan 07). Retrieved July 29, 2021, from https://essayscollector.com/examples/sleep-deprivation-essay/