Dibs In Search Of Self Essay

Example #1

In most cases, play therapy is used to observe the acts of a child. Doctor Axline used play therapy with Dibs to help him feel more comfortable. In the room she could have observed him and how he interacted with the items. If she were in her office, she might not have had any luck in helping him. The environment of a play therapy room must be familiar to the patient.

PaperHelp.org Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically For You!


Check Price

The room would have to contain materials for the child to play with. The room described in the book had a sandbox, dollhouse, paints, and various other toys. The dollhouse was used to simulate Dibs? home life. He could speak through the dolls without having to entirely open up. The paints let him express his feelings without having to use words.

Before Dibs was in play therapy he did not have a good relationship with his parents. Doctor Axline immediately picked up on that when she met with Dibs? mother. His mother identified him as being mentally retarded.? Doctor Axline discovered how Dibs? insensitive parents treated him when he was playing with the dollhouse. He observed that all the doors and windows on the house were closed. Did he begin to repeatedly say? No closed doors,? in a harsh voice.

Doctor Axline later understood that Dibs? father would send him to his room and lock the door. This was Dib’s punishment for not being able to act and talk like a normal child. Dib’s father was very impatient with him while his mother tried her hardest to help him. When Dibs was in play therapy he had more freedom than he had at his home. Doctor Axline let him be himself without being disciplined for it. This made him open up to her. She was no longer a stranger to him.

She was someone he felt that no matter when he did around her, he would never get in trouble for doing it. This helped Dibs in becoming more open about his feelings and emotions. He was more enjoyable at home. His parents commented on how he would talk with them without throwing a fit.

Dibs was shy when he first met Doctor Axline. The whole play therapy experience was new to him. When they first met alone, Dibs did not converse with her. He walked around the room touching and examining every object. Their conversations didn’t begin until he began to name every object that he picked up. If Dibs picked up a ball and said, ?ball,? then she would reply, yes that is a ball.? She never asked him questions that would disturb him. She never tried to pry information out of him.

As the weekly sessions progressed, their conversations became more intense. Dibs would voluntarily give information about how he felt. He would reenact events that happened in his house using the dolls. Doctor Axline soon found out how intelligent he was. Dibs liked his time with her. He soon became sad when their hour-long visits would end.

Dibs? parents were very skeptical about the idea of the play therapy sessions. They suggested that doctor Axline come to their house and have the therapy in his playroom. She would not agree to this. After some time passed by, the parents agreed to have the sessions. After the first few meetings, Dibs? mother scheduled an appointment to meet with doctor Axline.

She poured all of her feelings and emotions out to her. She was very emotional when describing the time when Dibs was born to the time at which the sessions began. Doctor Axline then realized how Dibs? parents? actions affected him. After many play therapy sessions occurred, Dibs? parents noticed how much he had improved. They were very appreciative of the work doctor Axline had done. Since Dibs had improved, his parents paid more attention to him. This made Dibs very happy.

 

Example #2

In most cases, play therapy is used to observe the acts of a child. Doctor Axline used play therapy with Dibs to help him feel more comfortable. In the room she could have observed him and how he interacted with the items. If she were in her office, she might not have had any luck in helping him. The environment of a play therapy room must be familiar to the patient.

The room would have to contain materials for the child to play with. The room described in the book had a sandbox, dollhouse, paints, and various other toys. The dollhouse was used to simulate Dibs’ home life. He could speak through the dolls without having to entirely open up. The paints let him express his feelings without having to use words.

Before Dibs was in play therapy he did not have a good relationship with his parents. Doctor Axline immediately picked up on that when she met with Dibs’ mother. His mother identified him as being “mentally retarded.” Doctor Axline discovered how Dibs’ insensitive parents treated him when he was playing with the dollhouse. He observed that all the doors and windows on the house were closed. He began to repeatedly say “No closed doors,” in a harsh voice.

Doctor Axline later understood that Dibs’ father would send him to his room and lock the door. This was Dibs’ punishment for not being able to act and talk like a “normal” child. Dibs’ father was very impatient with him while his mother tried her hardest to help him. When Dibs’ was in play therapy he had more freedom than he had at his home.

Doctor Axline let him be himself without being disciplined for it. This made him open up to her. She was no longer a stranger to him. She was someone he felt that no matter when he did around her, he would never get in trouble for doing it. This helped Dibs in becoming more open about his feelings and emotions. He was more enjoyable at home.

 

Example #3 – Analysis of Dibs in Search of Self

The book Dibs in Search of Self is a story of a smart yet very unsocial and withdrawn little boy named Dibs. The story, written from Dr. Axline’s point of view, shows how Dibs goes from being completely unable to function in a normal classroom setting with other children to discovering himself through play therapy. Nowhere is the book is Dibs specifically diagnosed or even characterized as being autistic.

This is not surprising as autism was not really widely understood or diagnosed until the 1960s; this book was written in 1964. There are many correlations between this book and some of the theories and topics discussed in Berger’s text. I would like to address some of these correlations now.

This is exactly how Dr. Axline is working with Dibs. She is focusing on letting Dibs play, as he sees fit while she observes and minimally participates. Berger also describes programs that stress attachment. Dr. Axline, through gradual progression and participation, slowly builds a rapport and therefore attachment with Dibs.

This allows Dibs to become comfortable in his own time, under his own rules. This is important for autistic children who may have issues with trust and attachment. References: Axline, V. M. (1964). Dibs in search of self. New York: Ballentine Books. Berger, K. S. (2009). The developing person: Through childhood and adolescence.

 

Example #4 – Summary Of Dibs In Search Of Self By Virginia Axline

The behavioral approach is the idea that observable behavior is a result of environmental components and past experiences. These components are known as the stimuli and the behavioral effect that it produces is called its response. The explanation behind this idea is based on how individuals learn, which is through classical and operant conditioning.

Classical conditioning is a process that associates two stimuli, which then creates a new learned response every time those stimuli are paired together. The stimuli begin as being neutral, however, proceeds to turn to one that is conditioned. An excellent example of this idea is in Pavlov’s dog experiment where the dogs learned to associate a bell with food.

Operant conditioning is a process that correlates the likelihood of actions happening based on associating its positive or negative consequences. For instance in Skinner’s rat experiment, the rat knew to instantly go to the lever in its box once it figured out it would drop food which was positive reinforcement.

Negative reinforcement was also demonstrated when it would be removed and instead, the rat would be electrocuted when not on the lever, eventually the rat learned to go to the lever instantly to avoid the electricity. In the story, Dibs: In Search of Self by Virginia Axline, the main character Dibs often supported behaviorism.

 

Example #5

The book of Dibs is a very interesting read, it is about a young boy who has a rich family and dad is a well-known scientist and little sister gets all the attention and is a brat. Dibs attends a private school and doesn’t receive the attention he needs from his home life. The teachers observe Dibs and his actions as he sits in the classroom or crawls around the room and hides.

Dibs loves books and is always grabbing for some or finding some books to open. Dibs seems to come off to me as unsocial and bothered. In chapter 1, when they tell dibs that it is time to go home he doesn’t want to move. To me, it seems he doesn’t want to go home because his parents or sister pays attention to him so he sits alone and quite. It seems his parents don’t care about Dibs or care to figure out what is in his best interest.

There has to be a reason when they tell Dibs it is time to go home he doesn’t move or talk and balls up in his arms and won’t listen or look at anyone and throws a fit when they pick him up kicking screaming and crying or he just lets it happen and is quiet and looks and feels defeated.

I don’t like in chapter one how everyone just overlooks him or doesn’t show him enough attention or really tries to help him or see what is going on and how other parents look down upon him for his disability. Other parents don’t want Dibs there either because he has scratched or has bitten their children and don’t see that there is more going on with Dibs then him just being social.

 

Example #6

Dibs in Search of Self represents a true story about a young boy who managed to overcome psychological problems through play therapy.

Teachers are reluctant to engage Dibs in the study because of his reserved and indifferent attitude to studying. However, a series of therapy sessions help the boy overcome the difficulties and understand his needs and concerns.

Axline, the physician, manages to choose an emotionally neutral approach to Dibs to help him discover himself without additional emotional support. Unlike other teachers and therapists, Axline (1964) has defined that Dibs is just different from his peers, but not necessarily mentally retarded.

This conception is also supported by Berger who states that assuming difference as a deficit or as deviation cannot be regarded as a problem. Instead, specific attention should be given to unconventional methods and techniques for treating such children. By introducing play therapy, Axline (1964) has allowed the boy to widen the established boundaries of a psychologically tense environment and has provided him with much space for himself.

During the therapy sessions, the therapist realizes that Dibs is an incredibly bright personality who is able to read, write, draw, and express his thoughts. The main essence of her studies was the ignorance of emotional support. In such a way, Axline (1964) considered it unnecessary to reveal any attachment to her patients. This special relationship, however, helped the boy overcome his social problems and discover his talents and gifts that were not typical of children of his age.

According to Berger (2009), cognitive development can be achieved by means of both engaging in the school curriculum and knowledge obtained from the external environment (p. 7). Therefore, Dibs received much freedom for making choices in his life that he failed to receive before.

Play therapy consisted of placing dolls in Dibs’s life as if they were real. In such a manner, the boy could define which roles father and mother dolls should perform and how they should behave (Axline, 1964, p. 18).

Playing with dolls allowed Dibs to discover his feelings and attitudes toward his parents and peers, as well as understand what attitude he wished to feel toward himself from these people. To explain this issue, Berger (2009) refers to the importance of considering social contexts that play a crucial role in personality development.

Specifically, the scholar argues, “interactions between parents and among siblings are part of the context in which each person develops” (Berger, 2009, p. 12). A multinational understanding is a core to solving problems of developmental deviation among children. In conclusion, the consideration of Berger’s concept of cognitive development and multidimensional contexts is essential in understanding Axline’s play therapy.

Depriving the boy of emotional support, the psychotherapist freed Dibs from the boundaries established in a social environment by his parents, teachers, and peers. Introducing play therapy allowed the body to discover his personality, understand his concerns, and define further steps for perceiving the surrounding world.

Specifically, using dolls and dollhouses, Dibs managed to define the attitude he wanted to feel from his parents. He could also practice his social and communication skills. More importantly, the therapy provided the boy with possibilities of understanding his inner world, as well as realizing that he is just different but no worse than other children. Axline has managed to notice that the boy turned out extremely intelligent, with a high IQ level.

 

Example #7 – interesting ideas

The author, Dr. Virginia Axline, is consulted regarding a five-year-old boy, Dibs, who is considered to be retarded because of his great difficulty in relating to his extremely repressive family and others. Dibs is found to be sensitive and very bright indeed, and Axline’s unemotional psychotherapeutic treatment utilizing play therapy ultimately allows him to discover himself in his own way.


I’m a psychology major about to finish up my junior year of college. I have a personal interest in how traumatic events impact developing children. I am interested in childhood posttraumatic stress disorder, dissociation in children who have suffered traumatic events, psychological defense mechanisms used by these children, and how these traumatic events effect normal development and attachment.

I am looking for books that deal with the actual subject matter, not fictional stories. I am currently reading Treating complex traumatic stress disorder, edited by Courtois and Ford. I am looking for books similar to this, but deal exclusively with children.

I am looking for serious answers only, preferably by those who have actually read or are currently reading, such books. Please no-nonsense answers or comments that stray completely off-topic. Thanks in advance.

Answer.

Dibs in Search of Self is a true story of a psychologically traumatized boy and his successful treatment through play therapy. It was written by psychologist Virginia Axline. You may have more success asking about the books you require in the Psychology section of the Social Science category.

 

 

Cite this page

Choose cite format:
Dibs In Search Of Self Essay. (2020, Oct 06). Retrieved October 30, 2020, from https://essayscollector.com/examples/dibs-in-search-of-self-essay/



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *