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Hershey History Financial Report Analysis Company Profile

Financial report analysis of Hershey Foods Corporation, Hershey Foods History

INTRODUCTION

Hershey Foods Corporation is engaged, with its subsidiaries, in the manufacture, distribution and sale of confectionery and grocery products. The Company’s principal product groups include confectionery products sold in the form of bar goods, bagged items and boxed items, as well as grocery products in the form of baking ingredients, chocolate drink mixes, peanut butter, dessert toppings and beverages.

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Hershey Foods manufactures confectionery products in a variety of packaged forms and markets them under more than 50 brands. The different packaged forms include various arrangements of the same bar products, such as boxes, trays and bags, as well as a variety of different sizes and weights of the same bar products, such as snack size, standard, king size, large and giant bars..

The Company also manufactures and/or markets grocery products in the baking, beverage, peanut butter and toppings categories. Principal products in the United States include Hershey’s, Reese’s and Heath baking pieces, Hershey’s chocolate milk mix, Hershey’s cocoa, Hershey’s Chocolate Shoppe ice cream toppings, Hershey’s Hot Cocoa Collection hot cocoa mix, Hershey’s syrup and Reese’s peanut butter. Hershey’s chocolate- and strawberry-flavoured milks are produced and sold under license by various dairies throughout the United States, using milk mixes manufactured by the Company.

The Company’s products are sold primarily to grocery wholesalers, chain grocery stores, candy distributors, mass merchandisers, chain drug stores, vending companies, wholesale clubs, convenience stores, concessionaires and food distributors by full-time sales representatives, food brokers and part-time retail sales merchandisers throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico. In 2002, sales to Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. and subsidiaries amounted to approximately 21% of Hershey Foods’ total net sales.

Hershey Foods manufactures, imports, markets, sells and distributes chocolate products in Brazil under the Hershey’s brand name. Additional products in Brazil include IO-IO hazelnut creme items and chocolate and confectionery products sold under the Visconti brand name. In China, Japan, Korea and the Philippines, the Company imports and/or markets selected confectionery and grocery products. It also markets confectionery and grocery products in over 90 countries worldwide.

ANALYSIS OF BALANCE SHEET

ASSETS

Total assets increased $233.1 million, or 7%, as of December 31, 2002, primarily as a result of higher cash and cash equivalents, prepaid expenses and other current assets, and other non-current assets, partially offset by lower deferred income taxes, inventories, property, plant, and equipment, and goodwill.

Current assets increased by $96.1 million, or 8%, principally reflecting increased cash and cash equivalents, prepaid expenses and other current assets, substantially offset by a decrease in deferred income taxes. The increase in cash and cash equivalents reflected strong cash flows from operations during the year, offset by contributions of $308.1 million to the Corporation’s pension plans.

Prepaid expenses and other current assets reflected higher prepaid pension expense associated with the funding of pension plans during the year and increased original margin balances for commodity futures. The elimination of current deferred income taxes resulted primarily from the significant liability related to the tax effect on other comprehensive income associated with the gains on commodity futures contracts during the year.

Property, plant and equipment was lower than the prior year primarily due to depreciation expense of $155.4 million and the retirement of property, plant and equipment of $19.0 million, partially offset by capital additions of $132.7 million. The decrease in goodwill primarily reflected the impact of the sale of certain confectionery brands to Farley’s & Sather’s and foreign currency translation. The increase in other non-current assets primarily resulted from the pension plan funding during the year.

LIABILITIES

Total liabilities increased by $8.6 million, as of December 31, 2002, primarily reflecting a reduction in accrued liabilities, partially offset by an increase in deferred income taxes. The decrease in accrued liabilities was principally the result of lower pension liabilities resulting from the funding in 2002 and a decrease in enhanced employee benefits and other liabilities associated with business realignment initiatives recorded in the fourth quarter of 2001.

The increase in total current and non-current deferred income taxes was primarily associated with the impact of the tax effect on other comprehensive income and the pension funding, respectively

CAPITAL STRUCTURE

The Corporation has two classes of stock outstanding, Common Stock and Class B Common Stock (“Class B Stock”). Holders of the Common Stock and the Class B Stock generally vote together without regard to class on matters submitted to stockholders, including the election of directors, with the Common Stock having one vote per share and the Class B Stock having ten votes per share.

However, the Common Stock, voting separately as a class, is entitled to elect one-sixth of the Board of Directors. With respect to dividend rights, the Common Stock is entitled to cash dividends 10% higher than those declared and paid on the Class B Stock. In December 2000, the Corporation’s Board of Directors unanimously adopted a Stockholder Protection Rights Agreement (“Rights Agreement”).

The Rights Agreement was supported by the Corporation’s largest stockholder, the Milton Hershey School Trust. This action was not in response to any specific effort to acquire control of the Corporation. Under the Rights Agreement, the Corporation’s Board of Directors declared a dividend of one right (“Right”) for each outstanding share of Common Stock and Class B Stock payable to stockholders of record at the close of business on December 26, 2000. The Rights will at no time have voting power or receive dividends. The issuance of the Rights has no dilative effect, will not affect reported earnings per share, is not taxable and will not change the manner in which the Corporation’s Common Stock is traded.

COMMON-SIZED ANALYSIS

Current YearPrevious year

Current assets8.55%4.13%

Goodwill10.87%11.96%

Fixed assets42.69%47.26%

Other Intangible assets1.19%1.2%

Other assets8.98%3.6%

Total assets100%100%

Current liabilities15.7%18.67%

Total liabilities60.58%64.67%

Stockholder equities39.41%35.32%

ANALYSIS OF INCOME STATMENT

NET SALES

Net sales decreased $16.9 million from 2001 to 2002, primarily as a result of increased promotion costs and returns, discounts, and allowances, the divestiture of the Heide brands in 2002 and the Luden’s throat drop business in 2001, and the timing of sales related to the gum and mint business acquired from Nabisco Inc. (“Nabisco”), which resulted in incremental sales in 2001 compared with 2002.

A sluggish retail environment, characterized by the bankruptcies and store closings of certain customers, also contributed to the lower sales. Sales were also lower in several international markets, particularly Canada and Brazil. These sales decreases were partially offset by volume increases of key confectionery brands, including new products and line extensions, and selected confectionery selling price increases, as well as incremental sales from the Visagis acquisition, the Brazilian chocolate and confectionery business acquired in July 2001.

In December 2002, the Corporation announced an increase of 11% in the price of standard-size candy bars effective January 1, 2003, representing an average increase of approximately 3% over the entire domestic product line. A buy-in prior to the January 1, 2003 price increase resulted in an approximate 1% to 2% increase in fourth-quarter, 2002 sales. Net sales rose $316.8 million, or 8%, from 2000 to 2001.

The increase in 2001 was primarily due to incremental sales from the mint and gum business acquired from Nabisco in December 2000 and increases in sales of base confectionery and grocery products, primarily resulting from the introduction of new confectionery products, selected confectionery selling price increases in the United States, and increased international exports. These increases were partially offset by lower sales resulting from higher promotional allowances; the divestiture of the Luden’s throat drops business and the impact of unfavourable foreign currency exchange rates.

COST OF SALES

Cost of sales decreased $107.5 million, or 4%, from 2001 to 2002. Cost of sales in 2002 included $6.4 million of costs primarily related to the relocation of equipment associated with the Corporation’s business realignment initiatives. Cost of sales in 2001 included $50.1 million associated with business realignment initiatives recorded in the fourth quarter of that year.

Excluding costs related to the business realignment initiatives in both years, the cost of sales decreased $63.8 million from 2001 to 2002, primarily as a result of lower costs for certain major raw materials, primarily cocoa, milk and packaging materials and reduced supply chain costs, particularly related to shipping and distribution. The gross margin increased from 35.5% in 2001 to 37.8% in 2002. Gross margin in 2001 was negatively impacted 1.2 percentage points from the inclusion in the cost of sales of a charge of $50.1 million associated with business realignment initiatives recorded during the fourth quarter of that year.

Gross margin in 2002 was reduced by .2 percentage points from business realignment charges of $6.4 million recorded in cost of sales during the year. Excluding the impact of the business realignment initiatives in both years, the increase in gross margin from 36.7% in 2001 to 38.0% in 2002 primarily reflected decreased costs for certain major raw materials, higher profitability resulting from the mix of confectionery items sold in 2002 compared with sales in 2001 and the impact of supply chain efficiencies. These increases in gross margin were partially offset by higher promotion

Costs and returns, discounts, and allowances, which were higher as a percent of sales compared to the prior year. Gross margin was also unfavourably impacted in 2002 by poor profitability in the Corporation’s Canadian and Brazilian businesses. Cost of sales increased $197.4 million, or 8%, from 2000 to 2001. Cost of sales in 2001 included a charge of $50.1 million associated with business realignment initiatives recorded during the fourth quarter.

The $50.1 million charges to cost of sales resulted from the reduction of raw material inventories, principally cocoa beans and cocoa butter, no longer required to support operations as a result of outsourcing the manufacturing of certain ingredients.

Excluding the impact of the business realignment initiatives, cost of sales increased $147.3 million, primarily reflecting higher costs associated with increased sales volume, partially offset by lower costs for freight, distribution and warehousing, as well as improved supply chain efficiencies including decreased costs for the disposal of aged finished goods inventory and obsolete packaging.

The gross margin increased from 35.3% in 2000 to 35.5% in 2001. Gross margin in 2001 was negatively impacted 1.2 percentage points from the inclusion in the cost of sales of a charge of $50.1 million associated with business realignment initiatives recorded during the fourth quarter. Excluding the impact of the business realignment initiatives, the increase in gross margin to 36.7% in 2001 resulted from lower costs for freight, distribution and warehousing, as well as improved supply chain efficiencies, including decreased costs for the disposal of aged finished goods inventory and obsolete packaging.

Selected confectionery selling price increases and the profitability of the mint and gum business acquired from Nabisco also contributed to the higher gross margin in 2001. The impact of these items was partially offset by higher manufacturing costs, primarily related to higher labor rates and employee benefits costs, as well as start-up costs associated with the installation of new manufacturing equipment.

SELLING, MARKETING AND ADMINISTRATIVE

Selling, marketing and administrative expenses decreased by $13.6 million, or 1.6% in 2002, primarily as a result of savings from the business realignment initiatives and the elimination of goodwill amortization in 2002, offset by $17.2 million of expenses incurred to explore the possible sale of the Corporation, as discussed below. Excluding incremental expenses incurred to explore the Corporation’s sale in 2002 and the impact of the amortization of intangibles in 2001, selling, marketing, and administrative expenses decreased $16.0 million, or 2%, from 2001 to 2002.

The decrease in 2002 primarily reflected lower advertising, depreciation and administrative expenses, partially offset by higher expenses associated with increased consumer marketing programs and selling activities. On July 25, 2002, the Corporation confirmed that the Hershey Trust Company, as Trustee for the Benefit of Milton Hershey School (the “Milton Hershey School Trust”) which controls 77.6% of the combined voting power of the Corporation’s Common Stock and Class B Common Stock, had informed the Corporation that it had decided to diversify its holdings and in this regard wanted Hershey Foods to explore a sale of the entire Corporation. On September 17, 2002, the Milton Hershey School Trust informed the Corporation that it had elected not to sell its controlling interest and requested that the process to explore a sale be terminated.

Selling, marketing and administrative expenses increased $120.4 million, or 17%, from 2000 to 2001, primarily reflecting selling, marketing and administrative expenditures for the newly acquired mint and gum business, increased administrative expenses primarily resulting from higher staffing levels to support sales activity in North America and international businesses, increased marketing expenses and higher incentive compensation expense. Selling, marketing and administrative costs in 2000 included a one-time gain of $7.3 million arising from the sale of certain corporate aircraft

GAIN ON SALE OF BUSINESS

In September 2001, the Corporation completed the sale of the Luden’s throat drops business to Pharmacia Consumer Healthcare, a unit of Pharmacia Corporation. Included in the sale were the trademarks and manufacturing equipment for the throat drops business. In the third quarter of 2001, the Corporation received cash proceeds of $59.9 million and recorded a gain of $19.2 million before tax, $1.1 million after tax, as a result of the transaction.

A higher gain for tax purposes reflected the low tax basis of the intangible assets included in the sale, resulting in taxes on the gain of $18.1 million. Net sales for the Luden’s throat drops business were $8.9 million and $20.7 million in 2001 and 2000, respectively.

INTEREST EXPENSE

Net interest expense for 2002 was $8.4 million below the prior year, primarily as a result of a decrease in short-term interest expense due to reduced average short-term borrowings. Net interest expense for 2001 was $6.9 million below 2000 reflecting a decrease in short-term interest expense due to a decrease in average short-term borrowing rates and reduced average short-term borrowings.

INCOME TAXES

The Corporation’s effective income tax rate was 36.7% in 2002, 39.7% in 2001, and 38.8% in 2000. Excluding the income tax benefit associated with charges pertaining to the business realignment initiatives and the income tax provision associated with the gain on the sale of the Luden’s throat drops business, the effective income tax rate was 37.3% in 2001. The decrease in the effective income tax rate of .6 percentage points in 2002 primarily reflected the impact of the elimination of the amortization of intangibles effective January 1, 2002. The decrease of 1.5 percentage points from 2000 to 2001 was primarily due to the lower tax rate on the mint and gum business acquired in December 2000.

NET INCOME

Net income increased $196.4 million from 2001 to 2002. Excluding the after-tax effect of the business realignment initiatives in 2002 and 2001, the after-tax effect of incremental expenses to explore the possible sale of the Corporation in 2002 and the after-tax gain on the sale of the Luden’s throat drops business in 2001, net income increased $44.5 million or 11%. Net income decreased $127.4 million, or 38%, from 2000 to 2001.

Excluding the after-tax gain on the sale of the Luden’s throat drops business and the after-tax effect of the business realignment initiatives recorded in 2001, as well as the after-tax gain on sale of corporate aircraft in 2000, net income increased $47.8 million, or 14%, from 2000 to 2001. Net income reflecting the elimination of the amortization of intangibles would have been higher by $13.6 million and $13.5 million in 2001 and 2000, respectively.

Comparable net income reflecting the elimination of the amortization of intangibles as a percent of net sales was: 10.6% in 2002, excluding the after-tax effect of the business realignment initiatives and incremental expenses to explore the possible sale of the Corporation; 9.5% in 2001, excluding the after-tax gain on the sale of the Luden’s throat, drops business and the after-tax effect of the business realignment initiatives; and 9.0% in 2000, excluding the after-tax gain on the sale of corporate aircraft.

 

COMMON-SIZE ANALYSIS

Current year Previous year

Revenue100%100%

COGS62.15%64.50%

SG&A20.22%20.47%

Interest expense1.47%1.6%

Income taxes5.6%3.3%

Net income9.8%5%

 

ANALYSIS OF CASH FLOW STATEMENT

CASH FLOW ACTIVITIES

Cash flow ActivityCurrent yearPrevious year

Operating 625,343706,405

Investing132,572123,987

Financing329,175480,240

Increase(decease) in cash163,595102,178

Beginning cash balance134,14731,969

Ending cash balance197,743134,147

Over the past three years, cash from operating activities provided approximately $1.8 billion. Over this period, cash used by or provided from accounts receivable and inventories has tended to fluctuate as a result of sales during December and inventory management practices. Cash provided from inventories was principally associated with a reduction of raw material inventories in December 2001 as part of the Corporation’s business realignment initiatives.

The change in cash required for or provided from other assets and liabilities between the years was primarily related to hedging transactions, the timing of payments for accrued liabilities, including income taxes, and variations in the funded status of pension plans. Investing activities included capital additions, capitalized software additions, business acquisitions and divestitures. Capital additions during the past three years included the purchase of manufacturing equipment, and expansion and modernization of existing facilities. Capitalized software additions over the past three years were associated primarily with the ongoing enhancement of information systems.

In June 2002, the Corporation completed the sale of certain confectionery brands to Farley’s & Sather’s for $12.0 million in cash as part of its business realignment initiatives. In July 2001, the Corporation’s Brazilian subsidiary, Hershey do Brazil, acquired the chocolate and confectionery business of Visagis for $17.1 million. In September 2001, the Luden’s throat drops business was sold for $59.9 million in cash.

The acquisition of Nabisco’s mint and gum business for $135.0 million was completed in 2000. Financing activities included debt borrowings and repayments, payments of dividends, the exercise of stock options, incentive plan transactions, and the repurchase of Common Stock. During the past three years, short-term borrowings in the form of commercial paper or bank borrowings were used to purchase Nabisco’s mint and gum business, fund seasonal working capital requirements, and finance share repurchase programs.

During the past three years, a total of 4,261,484 shares of Common Stock have been repurchased for $224.4 million. Cash used for incentive plan transactions of $274.7 million during the past three years was partially offset by cash received from the exercise of stock options of $141.1 million. Cash used by incentive plan transactions reflected purchases of the Corporation’s Common Stock in the open market to replace treasury stock issued for stock options exercises.

ANALYSIS OF RETURN

 

OPERATING RETURN AVERAGE STAOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

The Corporation’s operating return on average stockholders’ equity was 34.6% in 2002. Over the most recent six-year period, the return has ranged from 28.9% in 1999 to 37.6% in 1998. For the purpose of calculating operating return on average stockholders’ equity, earnings are defined as net income adjusted to reflect the impact of the elimination of the amortization of intangibles for all years and excluding the after-tax effect of incremental expenses to explore the possible sale of the Corporation in 2002, the after-tax effect of the business realignment initiatives in 2002 and 2001, and the after-tax gains on the sale of the Luden’s throat drop business in 2001, the sale of corporate aircraft in 2000, and the sale of the pasta business in 1999.

OPERATING RETURN ON AVERAGE INVERSTED CAPITAL

The Corporation’s operating return on average invested capital was 19.7% in 2002. Over the most recent six-year period, the return has ranged from 15.4% in 1999 to 19.7% in 2002. Average invested capital consists of the annual average of beginning and ending balances of long-term debt, deferred income taxes and stockholders’ equity.

For the purpose of calculating operating return on average invested capital, earnings is defined as net income adjusted to reflect the impact of the elimination of the amortization of intangibles for all years and excluding the after-tax effect of incremental expenses to explore the possible sale of the Corporation in 2002, the after-tax effect of the business realignment initiatives in 2002 and 2001, the after-tax gains on the sale of the Luden’s throat drops business in 2001, the sale of corporate aircraft in 2000, and the sale of the pasta business in 1999, and the after-tax effect of interest on long-term debt.

FINANCIAL CONDITION

The Corporation’s financial condition remained strong during 2002. The capitalization ratio (total short-term and long-term debt as a percent of stockholders’ equity, short-term and long-term debt) was 39% as of December 31, 2002, and 44% as of December 31, 2001. The ratio of current assets to current liabilities was 2.3:1 as of December 31, 2002, and 1.9:1 as of December 31, 2001.

In June 2002, the Corporation completed the sale of certain confectionery brands to Farley’s & Sather’s for $12.0 million in cash as part of its business realignment initiatives. Included in the transaction were the Heide, Jujyfruits, Wunderbeans and Amazin’ Fruit trademarked confectionery brands, as well as the rights to sell Chuckles branded products, under license. In September 2001, the Corporation completed the sale of the Luden’s throat drops business to Pharmacia Consumer Healthcare, a unit of Pharmacia Corporation.

Included in the sale were the trademarks and manufacturing equipment for the throat drops business. Under a supply agreement with Pharmacia, the Corporation agreed to manufacture Luden’s throat drops for up to 19 months after the date of sale. Under a separate services agreement, the Corporation agreed to continue to sell, warehouse and distribute Luden’s throat drops through March 2002. In the third quarter of 2001, the Corporation received cash proceeds of $59.9 million and recorded a gain of $19.2 million before tax, $1.1 million or $.01 per share-diluted after-tax, as a result of the transaction.

In July 2001, the Corporation’s Brazilian subsidiary, Hershey do Brazil, acquired the chocolate and confectionery business of Visagis for $17.1 million. This business had sales of approximately $20 million in 2000. Included in the acquisition were the IO-IO brand of hazelnut crème items and the chocolate and confectionery products sold under the Visconti brand. Also included in the purchase were a manufacturing plant and confectionery equipment in Sao Roué, Brazil. Had the results of the acquisition been included in the consolidated results for the full year of 2001 and for 2000, the effect would not have been material. In December 2000, the Corporation completed the purchase of the intense and breathes freshener mints and gum business of Nabisco.

The Corporation paid $135.0 million to acquire the business, including Ice Breakers and Breath Savers Cool Blasts intense mints, Breath Savers mints, and Ice Breakers, Carefree, Stick*Free, Bubble Yum and Fruit Stripe gums. Also included in the purchase were manufacturing machinery and equipment and a gum-manufacturing plant in Las Piedras, Puerto Rico. The Corporation’s results of operations for 2000 did not include results of the acquisition, as the transaction was completed very late in the year. Had the results of the acquired business been included in the consolidated results for 2000, the effect would not have been material.

RATIO ANALYSIS

RatioCurrent yearPrevious yearComment

Receivable turnover: 11.2510.98No big change

Inventory turnover5.055.01No big change

Current ratio2.311.92No big change

Quick ratio1.220.81No big change

Debt to total assets0.610.64No big change

OUTLOOK

Going forward, the Corporation has set balanced long-term goals, including three to four percent revenue growth; continued gross margin expansion; nine to eleven percent growth in earnings per share; improvement in returns on invested capital and continued market share gains.

In December 2002, the Corporation announced an increase of approximately 11% in the price of standard-size candy bars effective January 1, 2003, representing an average increase of 3% over the entire domestic product line. Sales volume growth in 2003 is expected to be somewhat lower than the Corporation’s long-term goal as a result of the price increase and sales growth in the first quarter of 2003 will be lower as a result of the buy-in in the fourth quarter of 2002.

The Corporation intends to make further gains in market share and to increase spending on brand building and selling capabilities in 2003. Results in 2003 will also benefit from cost savings generated from the business realignment initiatives and continued control of administrative costs. The Corporation expects to expand margins in 2003, as the Corporation continues to increase sales in more profitable product lines and improve operating efficiencies throughout the supply chain.

In addition, commodity costs are anticipated to be relatively stable in 2003 as a result of the Corporation’s forward purchasing and hedging practices. The Corporation plans to achieve earnings per share growth of nine to eleven percent in 2003 from its operating performance and execution of its share repurchase program, as discussed below.

Profitability in future periods is affected by various factors, including sales volume, selling prices, raw material and logistics costs, manufacturing efficiencies and the mix of products sold in any period. Cocoa market prices rose sharply during 2002 and this increase accelerated following a rebellion in the world’s largest cocoa-producing country, the Ivory Coast.

Continued civil unrest in the Ivory Coast could result in further cocoa price increases. The Corporation’s costs during 2003 and beyond will not necessarily reflect market price fluctuations because of its forward purchasing practices, premiums and discounts are reflective of relative values, varying delivery times, and supply and demand for specific varieties and grades of cocoa beans.

The Corporation’s costs for cocoa will increase substantially in 2004; however, the Corporation expects to achieve its long-term goals for growth and profitability by a combination of price increases and/or product weight changes, improved sales mix, supply chain cost reductions and strict control of other costs to offset potential cost increases and respond to changes in the competitive environment.

The Corporation expects strong cash flows from operating activities in 2003. Net cash provided from operating activities is expected to exceed cash requirements for capital additions, capitalized software additions and anticipated dividend payments. The Corporation will continue to monitor the funded status of pension plans based on market performance and make future contributions as appropriate.

The Corporation announced on December 12, 2002, that it is authorized to acquire up to $500 million of the Corporation’s Common Stock in the open market or through privately negotiated transactions. This authorization is expected to be completed within approximately 12 months, subject to trading liquidity, and will be funded by cash provided from operations and short-term borrowings.

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